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Terreson Profile
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Not sure where to put this


If I still had a hand that could hold pen to paper for more than five minutes I would commit this note to a journal. A note barely worth the electrons I'll expend making it.

Does anybody else spend time thinking on Jesus, the Nazarene? Just to be clear I am not a Christian. The passion of His death defies natural law. Lying three days dead in a tomb and then corporally rising, pushing against a tomb door even? EMT friends tell me that 15 minutes dead and dead is dead. I consider the central passion, central to the faith, absurd. But the boy intrigues me for reasons I don't get.

He must have been a complicated man. We know he didn't know who his father was. Back then that was pretty common and still is. Moses didn't know who is father was either. We know he was kind of cruel too, dissed, his own mother. We know he had a hankering for prostitutes. Back then holy prostitutes were thought of differently, sacredly actually. We know he could see goodness in people not belonging to his own ethnic group. And we know he needed people to believe in him (his disciples), he needed security (Peter), he needed a sense of magic (walking on water and such), and that he would eventually succomb to his own paranoia (Judas).

What a complicated man he must have been. I remember an uncle, a Rosicrusian, who reminded me of something this complicated man said. Love is the law.

Tere
Oct/11/2010, 11:34 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Zakzzz5 Profile
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Re: Not sure where to put this - Revision 2


I don't find the resurrection absurd for the simple reason that neither physicists nor philosophers today can come up with a theory of reality that doesn't keep shifting beneath their feet. Your description above simply addresses the material end of it. And what you say would make sense under normal circumstances.
 
 
It's my understanding that Thomas Jefferson took a knife or scissors and cut out all of the miracles and left only his sayings. Jefferson saw the miracles as myths, probably. Joseph Campbell, and others, however, have penetrated to the truth behind the myths of many ancient gods/Gods. So I'm not sure that Jefferson did himself a favor by deleting the miracles. You've read Campbell, so you know what I mean.




Last edited by Zakzzz5, Oct/19/2010, 11:10 am
Oct/12/2010, 7:25 pm Link to this post Send Email to Zakzzz5   Send PM to Zakzzz5
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Not sure where to put this


Sorry, Zak. Somehow I failed to respond to your post. A case of my bad.

You are right. All myths point to a truth(s) not found elsewhere. A layered truth I might add. The resurrection theme, for example, is at least as old as the ancient Egyptian religion involving Osiris, Isis, and Set. Pointing, as it does, to rebirth and renewal, it likely is as old as agriculture itself, about 7,000 BP, the central mystery of which being fertility. Nor was Christianity the first religion to give the theme a more personal direction. Ancient Greece's Orphic Mysteries did the same a good 6 to 7 hundred years before the birth of Jesus. Campbell, by the way, maintained the Mysteries kept in play and popular a good 500 years into the Christian era in what we now call central Europe. Anyway, Campbell pretty much summed it all up when he spoke of the various masks of god.

Besides, Zak, my own belief system is as unprovable, what amounts to the Gaia hypothisis, that the planet's biosphere is alive, a single entity with her own purpose. Maybe in the end one's beliefs, on a gut level, merely point to one's intuitive inclinations.

Tere
Dec/4/2010, 2:22 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 


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