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libramoon Profile
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Brave New Age


Voices in my head speak
in poetry, prose, creative nonfiction
stories of courage, adventures in change


Atheism as a movement was a creature of post-Industrial Revolution godless capitalism. Existential angst arose to take on the responsibility no longer assumed to God.

In these post-postmodern times, spirituality is eagerly embraced, the religious biases of the past less so. We want that all-seeing unconditional love we have learned is not forthcoming from mere humans or material wealth.


I have traveled beyond the waters,
acrid, poisoned water,
bound and bleeding daughters,
wail of senseless slaughter,
blinded by the rain.

I have walked
sands of endless hatred,
crumbled stone as hate did.
explaining "It was fated."
relinquishing the blame.

Dark of the night, quiet,
unable to lie,
I search for the truth of
my age in unfathomed sky.
Not Heaven, not Home to a
rescuing I -- the Mystic's mystery.
Hugely greater than a Creator of history.
Stars, Galaxies
without end


August 21, 2011
Aug/21/2011, 2:25 pm Link to this post Send Email to libramoon   Send PM to libramoon Blog
 
Alkiviades Profile
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Re: Brave New Age


I had a proper resonse typed out and accidently deleted it all. I suppose this would be fitting considering the theme.

Oh drat! I will have to comment again when I have a tad more vigor in my veins. Suffice to say (for now) that the progression of this spiritual oddyssey is something that touches a chord deep within.

quote:

Dark of the night, quiet,
unable to lie,
I search for the truth of
my age in unfathomed sky.
Not Heaven, not Home to a
rescuing I -- the Mystic's mystery.
Hugely greater than a Creator of history.
Stars, Galaxies
without end [/quote

Articulated well, this quest, this unquenched thirst. I always adore the lucid,dream-like descriptions you give, the way your words seem tp float the reader/traveler.

alki
Aug/21/2011, 7:37 pm Link to this post Send Email to Alkiviades   Send PM to Alkiviades Blog
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Brave New Age


Good. Poem in Field Notes. Here I can respond to content, not having to concern myself with form.

Repeating myself here. Moyers asked Campbell if ours is an age of crisis. For Campbell the crisis was spiritual. Also, the crisis is the biggest humanity has yet faced, which, when you take in the whole of world history since the so-called Iron Age of 3,000 years ago, is saying a lot. Sometimes I think I've read too much history, almost by definition his-story, and, again, since the dawning of the Iron Age, almost as brutal an Age, in some ways more so, since hand to hand, as the 20th C. For all his stream of consciousness ways, when James Joyce wanted to be specific, even declamatory, no one before or since has bested him. "History is a nightmare from which I am still trying to awaken." I feel that way sometimes, none too infrequently, especially when I pull up the record from my data bank. For 3,000 years humans, world wide, have proceeded from dark age to dark age, with periods of a more enlightened, friendlier way only punctuating the equillibrium of violence and dispossession. I used to blame contemporary violence of man on man (and on woman) as a matter of sheer numbers. Overpopulation. There is some truth to that. But I am not sure anymore. Estimated human population, globally, in the time of Christ is 150 million souls. Not even half of America's population today. But the times were dark then as well and would get darker. I could go on with the numbers. Within fifty years of European contact in the Americas, easily 90% of the Native American population was dead, mostly to disease. That is what I call biological warfare, intended or not.

Libra I don't think my reflections stray too far from your poem's address. In your lyrical I the poem takes in a whole lot of ground.

In a separate exchange Moyers asked Campbell what he thought would save us in the present (spiritual) crisis. Campbell said it would be the same as what saved Europe in the 11th C. The (spiritual) values expressed in Troubador poetry, essentially what amounted to the idealization of love and what becomes the mystical embrace. Elsewhere on the board I've chased down Campbell's thinking on the point. Here I'll just say I figure he was right. But again the moment punctuated against a backdrop amounting to an equillibrium of darkness. The European feudal system was at least as brutal, violent and cruel as the exacting economics of slavery in 19th C. America.

Libra, I am loving this poem of yours. It speaks to what I know. Do I think the mystical embrace will save the planet? I do not. Do I think anything other than such an embrace can? I do not. I find this embrace of yours in so many disparate places, world wide, in music, in literature, and in art. Funny that I don't find it in religion or politics.

Tere
Aug/27/2011, 4:00 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 


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