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arkava Profile
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posticon Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


quote:

Graves is particularly scathing of Blake’s tendency to mix his tenses, remain ‘imprecise and ambiguous’, ‘grammatically incoherent’ and to not care about the rhetorical focus of the poem.



http://www.rjdent.com/thetyger.htm
Dec/13/2012, 11:12 pm Link to this post Send Email to arkava   Send PM to arkava Blog
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


Yowsa. Thanks for this, Arka. I looked for but couldn't find the Graves essay on Blake's poem. If anyone has a link, I'd love to read it. As it stands now: A cautionary tale, if ever there was one, about the pitfalls of "workshopping" someone else's poem and attempting to (re)make it into your own image what a good poem should or should not be.
Dec/16/2012, 10:07 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
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Re: Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


"Cautionary tale" for sure. Thanks Arka,

Chris
Dec/16/2012, 12:18 pm Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
arkava Profile
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Re: Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


ha ha. yeah it's pretty funny. thanks for looking in guys. emoticon
Dec/17/2012, 11:45 am Link to this post Send Email to arkava   Send PM to arkava Blog
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


Finally getting around to your thread, Arka. I know a fair amount about Graves, his poetry and his life mostly, not so much his novels except for I Claudius. I've read his translations, his interpretations of Greek mythology, and, in particular, his seminal work The White Goddess, which thesis changed my life and gave me the first sense of poetry's rightful provenance. It would be too much to say he is one of my heroes. But without doubt he has been one of my principle guides.

That said, Graves's career proves the point that even genius can, on occassion, prove itself small minded. He could also be contentious and argumentative. No accident that, in his college days, he was a pugilist. His small pettiness showed itself supremely in the Ezra Pound case. After Pound was committed to St Elizabeth's hospital in Washington D.C., a mental institute, for his WW2 war crimes, the poet, Archibald Macleish, got poets, writers, artists, and intellectuals to sign a petition urging for his release. Thanks especially to Robert Frost the petition was successful. U.S. State Department signed off on Pound's release. Macleish asked Graves to join the effort to help a fellow poet. On the grounds that he had never considered Pound a poet in the first place, Graves refused his signature.

Small mindedness is the real killer here, the active force. For some strange reason, critics, perhaps poetry critics most of all, are subject to the disease. That is what I know. That is crux of this cautionary tale, as Kat calls it. That is why I am always reluctant in my crits.

Tere
Jan/13/2013, 2:30 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Robert Graves workshops Billy Blake


Hi Tere,

You say small-minded, I would say single-minded, but in the end maybe they amount to the same thing. I'm always a reluctant critic and second guess myself almost everytime. On a positive note, we shouldn't forget Eliot's dedication to Pound in TWL (il miglior fabbro, "the better craftsman") as his way of honoring and thanking Pound for all the work he did on the MS.
Jan/14/2013, 7:41 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 


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