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Terreson Profile
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Dew Drop Inn


Here is a thread for glorious details. The little things in a day that make us stop. Recipes, discoveries made while walking the cat, the man on the sidewalk whose glance makes you think of leaving your husband, the woman on the bus whose face makes your body stop, the child in your arms who smooths your heart, the road sign that persuades you to take the unintended turn, a moment revisited, just all the details that tell a little tale.

Tere

Last edited by Katlin, Nov/7/2011, 11:08 am
Feb/14/2009, 12:17 am Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Hi Tere,

To me the name Dew Drop Inn evokes a place were members can pour their favorite beverage, pull up a comfy chair and sit and chat a spell. About anything and everything, or about nothing in particular. Dew Drop Inn to shoot the breeze about the odds and ends of daily life and whatever else is on your mind or in your heart. Could be that harrowing visit to the dentist this morning, the music you are listening to as you type, the seed catalogue you are perusing while you dream of spring, the romantic getaway to the Poconos you are planning. If you are the narrative type, feel free to tell a little tale, or just stop by to drop in a thought, a prayer, a question or a one-liner.

Last edited by Katlin, Feb/19/2009, 8:50 pm
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Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Yep. What Katfriend says who actually describes the thread's intended purpose better. Just the glorious detail as described by the individual.

Tere
Feb/14/2009, 2:47 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
ChrisD1 Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Red Rover

I started walking in November. It's an early morning, five mile walk. Not an exercise
regime, more like a mind-clearing, mood moving kind of thing. I stumble out of the house
in baggy jeans, joints rattling, toes numb, nose running, wads of kleenex in the pocket of my jacket and put one foot in front of the other.

It's a short distance out of tract housing onto
the main streets. Sidewalks abutting traffic, which is constant and runs two lanes in each direction. Yesterday morning, about half way through the walk, I heard honking horns and squealing brakes. Turns out a dog had just crossed all four lanes. I didn't know it until he whizzed by me and startled me out of myself. He looked to be an Irish Setter/Lab combination, red and feathered but bulkier than a setter. Just running here and there, stopping to lift his leg every now and then.

So I was watching this scene unfold, envisioning the dog bounding back into traffic, when it occurred to me that I
could change the way the scene unfolded. I was part of it. I called him and he came right over, sat and let me read the tag hanging from his collar. No cell phone on me, I was thinking what to do next when a nice woman pulled up in an SUV. She got out and told me
she'd been driving her son to school and spotted the dog. Her son was worried, fearing for the dog. She offered to put the dog in her car and call the owner. Sure enough, he hopped right into the front seat.
The last thing I said to her was, "well, we did a good thing today."
Feb/19/2009, 4:49 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


A good thing, indeed, Chrisfriend. Here is what I especially like about the moment. It involves one dumb dog (setters are about as dumb as they come) who relies on the kindness of strangers, one alert child (danger, danger, Will Robinson), one intuitive woman (with peripheral observations), and a follow-up mom who circles back.

Note to Chrisfriend. Carry the fricking cell phone. You never know if it is a hungry cougar type behind you.

Tere
Feb/19/2009, 8:14 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Hi Chris,

I'd say it was that crazy, carefree Setter/Lab combo's lucky day. Red Rover, indeed. emoticon What I liked best about the incident is that just when you were wondering what to do next, the SUV lady drove up. She had probably been driving, seen the dog, heard her son's cries of alarm and wondered what to do next herself. You acted, then so did she. And just like that, the story had a happy ending.

Thanks for sharing it.

Can I refresh your drink? emoticon
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Thanks guys and yes, you can refresh my drink.
Someone else is bound to stop by with a story to tell. Cheers.

Chris
Feb/19/2009, 9:11 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Here's a dew drop in moment for you. First, please click on the link.

[url][sign in to see URL]

The Lord Jim. What a story she must have. I met her in the mid-eighties. '86 to be precise. She was ported in St. Augustine, FL. Hugh was her then owner. He was a Canadian national. An anthropologist by training. He had parachuted into Egypt during the Suez Canal crisis of the late '50's. He had smuggled arms into Angola when (white) South Africa had invaded the country. When I knew him he was involved in cocaine smuggling. On land he was a drunkard who seemed like he would take on the whole of the Reagan regime. On the sea he was a great sea captain. Look again at the picture of the Lord Jim. Over 60 feet and with three masts. Hugh rigged her so that he could sail her by himself. And this he did, even if mostly he wasn't alone. The younger women sure did love him.

Oh. I forgot to say that when I met the Lord Jim she had been just released by the Coast Guard after having been confiscated in a drug bust.

I never got to sail her. When I met her Hugh had just gotten her back and he was refitting her. She was in sorry shape and he really didn't have the money for the job. But I walked her once during a party he had on board. The party was down below and I was up deck. As disheveled as she was I remember being blown over by the beauty of her lines, her perfect balance, and her high mastiness. I thought that if ever there is a vanishing perspective the Lord Jim is it.

I was writing a novel that year. The Lord Jim got factored in. Come to think of it, so did Hugh, the great sea captain who stole away to the Caribbeans with the narrator's girl.

One more thing. Hugh must be dead by now. But I remember walking with him one Sunday night, kind of drunk, down the narrow streets of St Augustine. The chance is likely we were on our way to a R&B roadhouse called Scarlet O'Hara's. I remember noticing his gait, how he walked, how he had to almost pull one leg out in front and then the other, how he had to push forward from his thighs. I knew the signature of that walk. I never asked the question, but I knew that before Hugh had become a parachuter, gun runner, anthropologist, and smuggler, his child body had faught polio.

I just realized I don't like the link's picture of the Lord Jim. It tells nothing about her, herstory, or my friend who loved her almost as much as he loved women.

Tere



Last edited by Terreson, Mar/16/2009, 12:33 am
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Here is a dew drop inn moment if there ever was one.

My friend is a good man and a consummate beekeeper. He is also a good husband and a good father who delights in his family. His wife is a mighty fine person too.

One day he was unable to leave work at his normal time. He was about forty-five minutes late. As soon as he got into his car he called his wife to let her know he would be late. The immediate issue was their children who needed to be retrieved from their after-school baby sitter. He told her where he was, she knew the time, he told her he was just leaving work, he told her he would be late. She remonstrated him for calling so late, saying, 'we need to communicate.'

The next time he knew he would be late he called his wife at the time he would normally be leaving work. He told her he would be late. I think she wanted to know when he would be leaving. He said he didn't know. I think he reminded her she had told him they needed to communicate and so he was calling. She then said to him, you need to call me when you have something to communicate. It was finally decided she would pick up the children.

The afternoon of the second late-from-work conversation my friend was outside my office door. He walked in, said he didn't understand women, and told me the story. I got a great belly laugh out of the story. Seriously, it bent me over. Maybe I should have told my young friend there are some things a man is not priveleged enough to understand. I said nothing.

I do love these stories men and women friends tell me about them and their partners. The whole dynamic tickles me to no end. But then I've become exempt from it all. I remember a lover once. She told me how she had told her husband once that if he had to ask he didn't understand her. Her logic struck me as exquisite. But I felt for her husband too. I thought, 'poor b*st**d. He doesn't have a chance.'

Tere
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Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


I've been pretty scarce in these parts, haven't I. Sorry about that. Workload has been tremendous, having to make queens and new colonies for new tests. Plus it has been a bad spring with regards swarming pressures building. (Due to a warmer winter and an early spring producing an earlier than usual nectar flow.) Then the L.D. series and subsequent revisions. And now I've decided to finalize a collection in the making since '02 of sixty plus poems.

But I'll be around and bringing new goodies to the board. Trust all board buddies are well.

Tere
May/15/2009, 1:22 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


I just remember why I've come to put off finalizing poetry collections. The business is damn exhausting, much more so than a poem's first draft, even a poem's subsequent revisions. Bottom City Blues covers seven years and includes some eighty poems or so, a few of which are unweildy. The easy poems are the ones whose syntax is tight and controlled. The hard poems are the ones whose syntax, line rhythm and meter are loose and open. But the fit is on me. I am going to push it through. I just found a poem that looks to make poetry out of DNA sequencing. Found another poem looking to make poetry out of numbers involving Nam war casualties. And still another poem involving Ephesian mysteries of ancient Greece. This thing is bound to fail, but what the hell.

Tere
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Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Tere,

I'm glad to hear you are in a poetic groove, following your bliss and in your dharma as they say. Nothing beats being able to say, "For this I came."
May/17/2009, 7:06 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Yolee Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Hey Tere-

Looks like I made it.
Whew, what a trip.
Thank you for lending me a hand to get here.
I look forward to the give and take.

Cheers,

Y
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Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


This is making me smile, Yolyfriend. I don't understand why we had such difficulty gaining you membership. But here you are. Take a look around. i hope you like what you see.

Tere
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Yolee Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Thank you, Tere.
The problem must be with my connection at home.
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Zakzzz5 Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Terreson,

Glad your poetry is going well, and your editing. Glad the site's mechanical problems are fixed. What ever happened to Dragon? And is Pat ever coming back? These poetry sites expand and contract all the time.

Yolee,
Welcome. But weren't you on this site once before? Yes, it seems you were a regular. But welcome again. Zak
May/23/2009, 9:47 am Link to this post Send Email to Zakzzz5   Send PM to Zakzzz5
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


good to hear from you Zakman. how are things with you? Still busy? Thanks for your words about my writing. Yeah. It feels good. I have no information about Dragonman and Pat. I've heard that Dragonman has been focusing on his blog. That's all I got.

Looking forward to seeing your poetry again when you have something you want to show us.

Tere
May/24/2009, 12:08 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


I have to tell a story, certainly a dew drop inn moment.

Two weeks ago I was up in Massachusetts surveying honey bees that literally get transported from coast to coast. The bee keepers get paid to pollinate cash crops.

These bee yards are packed and crowded with colonies on pallets. Six to a pallet. And so opening a colony can be not just intrusive but disruptive. Our actions can cause a thing called robbing: a colony exposed will be attacked by foragers from neighboring colonies. This happens especially when nectar resources are scant and the foragers are desperate.

One afternoon the air is furious with bees. Furious. The engine of the sound so many bees are making is such you have to speak up over it in order to be heard. The exposed colonies are defending their homes while the robber foragers are looking to get into the exposed stores of nectar and honey. The situation can be dire. It can wipe out an entire bee yard. But we have no choice. We have to keep opening colonies and surveying the insides.

Something occurs to me. And so I say to a co-worker, 'God-damn. They are so preoccupied with each other they aren't even aware of our presence.' My friend gets it too. An hour or so later something else occurs to me. I say, 'What a perfect metaphor for human behavior. We are so preoccupied with each other we never actually get that the gods are f**king with us.' One co-worker gets the metaphor and another does not. He keeps saying, 'What? What?'

It is fascinating to me how some people have the capacity or the disposition for metaphor and some do not.

Tere
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deepwaters Profile
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Just saying hello


hi all -

I am back after another hiatus. This drop the worst so far, but I feel like this was it for a while to come. Just tipping my hat to you all. Thanks for letting me back in!

Also, I did my first poetry translation. I will post it in the appropriate forum and we will see how it goes.

-shab
(p.s. I just had to post here, my name meaning dewdrop and all emoticon)
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ChrisD1 Profile
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Re: Just saying hello


Welcome back, Shab! Looking forward to reading your translation.

Chris
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Terreson Profile
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Very good to see you again, Shab. As always I hope you are well and thriving. I am very curious about the poem you've translated. I hope you will also tell us something about the original and its author. No need to be shy here. You are among friends.

Tere
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Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


Hi Shab,

Welcome back. It's good to see Dew Drop in the Dew Drop. emoticon
Jul/25/2009, 4:51 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


This afternoon I was doing some scanning for a friend and came across this comment I found compelling:

"Read, if you have not read them, the works discussed by these critics. Read novels, that is, and keep criticism in its proper perspective as a means to the end of understanding fiction, just as fition itself is a means to the end of living a richer, more humane life."

from Approaches to the Novel: Material for Poetics by Robert Scholes
Jul/26/2009, 4:26 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
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Over in "News You Can Use" I posted about my friend Raphael Koseks's experiences with the Robert Frost Contest and with Finishing Line Press. I found several more of her poems online and thought some of you might enjoy them:

  
[sign in to see URL]%[sign in to see URL]
Nov/8/2009, 6:51 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
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Perhaps ya'll have noted in the news the incident involving a Tangipahoa Parrish Justic of the Peace refusing to marry a black man and a white woman out of (social) concern for the consequences it would have on their children.

Redshtick is a play on words. It is a local, satirical mag. (down the street from me). Baton Rouge is the French translation for the Choctaw name for the place:Red Stick. Story has it that on a bluff overlooking the Mississippi a tree was marked with blood to demarcate a boundary between competing tribes.

I love this cartoon. Upper right hand corner.

[sign in to see URL]

Tere
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Katlin Profile
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LOL, Tere. Heard about that story. Made the national news. Thanks for passing along the cartoon.
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Terreson Profile
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Hope springs eternal I think the saying goes. Personally, I think the tiger in #34 should be let out of her enclosure and let then the zoo owner blow a horn.

[sign in to see URL]

Tere
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Katlin Profile
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Re: Dew Drop Inn


I had a poet's weekend: I read "Emily Dickinson Is Dead: A Novel of Suspense" by Jane Langton and watched the movie "Bright Star." The book was fun, light reading, interspersed with quotes from ED's poetry and sketches of her bedroom, house and gardens. The movie was sad, serious viewing, interspersed with quotes from JK's poetry. I liked the actress who played Fanny but wished the actor who played John had been more passionate. I know he was playing a dying man, but I thought a dying mad in love should have more warmth and conviction. The actor who played Charles Brown, the third person in the love triangle, did a good job portraying the jealous, possessive wannabe poet. I wish Keats had come across as being as strong and interesting as the other two. Oh, yeah, and I would have liked more shop talk between Keats and Brown, and between Keats and his artist friends.
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ChrisD1 Profile
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I guess I had the opposite. Watched a Paul Newman movie from 1976 (Newman in his early 50's, still gorgeous) "Slap Shot." Hilarious. About a second-rate hockey team that finds fame and fortune by resorting to goon tactics on the ice. As one player puts it: "These guys are a f---in disgrace." spoken with bemused admiration.

I was thinking about seeing "Bright Star." Maybe I'll give it a look. After reading Kat's review, I won't expect to be wowed.

Chris
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Katlin Profile
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Hi Chris,

I miss Paul Newman. You put me in mind of S. E. Hinton's "The Outsiders" that begins:

quote:

When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house, I had only two things on my mind: Paul Newman and a ride home. I was wishing I looked like Paul Newman--he looks tough and I don't--but I guess my own looks aren't so bad.



Oh, don't let me discourage you from seeing "Bright Star." It is worth seeing, and I've been rethinking my earlier comments about the portrayal of Keats in light of two articles Rus linked to in Poetry and Poets in Rags. The first article is about Louise Gluck's works and includes these mentions about Keats:

quote:

In her essay “Against Sin­cer­ity” (in Proofs and The­o­ries, 1994) Glück spends some time con­sid­er­ing how, for Keats, “That world — this world — was heaven; in the other he could not believe, nor could he see his life as a rit­ual prepa­ra­tion. So he immersed him­self in the momen­tary splen­dor of the mate­r­ial world, which led always to the idea of loss.”

. . .

She writes that Keats “was given to describ­ing his meth­ods of com­po­si­tion in terms imply­ing a giving-in: the poet was to be pas­sive, respon­sive, avail­able to all sen­sa­tion. His desire was to reveal the soul, but soul, to Keats, had no spir­i­tual draperies. Spir­i­tu­al­ity man­i­fests the mind’s intim­i­dat­ing claim to inde­pen­dent life. It was this inven­tion Keats rejected. To Keats, the soul was cor­po­real and vital and frail; it had no life out­side the body.”



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The second article is a review of Stanley Plumly's biography of Keats:

quote:

Like anyone else, Keats has many dimensions. As he puts it in one of his early letters, before the nightmare of consumption begins to take him apart, “I feel more and more every day, as my imagination strengthens, that I do not live in this world alone but in a thousand worlds.”



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In the movie, we meet Keats when he is already sick, first meets Fanny Braun and just before his brother dies. Although he had some hope to live, Keats knew he was going to die. In light of that knowledge, perhaps the portrait of Keats was the most accurate, albeit unsettling, one. So, do see the movie; it's bittersweet. The actress who plays Fanny is excellent, and the costumes are stunning.
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