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Terreson Profile
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Professionalization of poetry


http://www.davidalpaugh.com/professionalization.html

I found this essay by chance yesterday while searching for something Pound said to Eliot. The article is unrelated to what I was looking for but I found it interesting in its own right. I almost decided not to pass it along as the writing is dense enough and repetitive and tangled enough as to work against the writer's argument. The writing would have benefited from sound editing.

This said, the writer has a point to make concerning the professionalization of poetry and several of its unintended, and deleterious, consequences.

I would be curious to know what others think. Personally I am reminded once again why I dropped out of a certain contemporary poetry scene almost two decades ago. It has no relevance to poetry.

Tere
Mar/8/2009, 1:04 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Thanks for the link, Tere. Well, this guy sure
paints a bleak picture of poetry's prospects; stifled and controlled by academia as he describes them. He makes a strong case for separation of poetry and paycheck.

He sounds a little knee-jerk conservative in his rejection of prose-poetry, lang-po etc. Cracks me up though, claiming those forms reflect the growing mediocrity of poetry practitioners. Lots to think about here and gives me permission to be skeptical of prevailing standards.

Chris
Mar/9/2009, 10:09 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
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You bet, Chrisfriend. In the end I found his notions a little more reactionary than actually challenging of a status quo. I was mostly with him through Part One. Part Two is where I had troubles with his thesis. (Is this what you got too?)

A bunch of years ago I actually wrote an essay touching upon similar notions about the professionalization of poetry. It seemed to me then that the problem resided in much the same problem WC Williams had with Eliot, who he accused of handing poetry "back over to the academy." And it still seems the case to me: a generation of American poets, looking for gainful employment, became teachers, the resulting manufacture of certified poets being both artificial and, in my view, a little disengenuous. As an aside, the irony of Williams' accusation is that by 1970 he himself arguably became the most read poet through out the college system's creative writing courses. Go figure.

As for the rest of the essay's ideas I almost feel as if the terms, prosification and nonfictionalication, are code words of some sort and speaking to an agenda that put a blip on my radar. What I mean is that the author hails from San Fransisco. I know that, presently, prose poetry is enjoying a kind of renascence in the Bay area. So what is the author's real agenda? See what I mean?

Anyway, I wrote a letter to the author last Sunday. If he replies, and assuming he gives permission, I'll share the exchange on the board. Might be fun.

Tere
Mar/10/2009, 8:14 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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That's it Tere, when he identified "prosification and defictionalization," as the symptoms of what ails poetry, I too sensed an agenda.

His explanation of the cause was interesting though:

"The professionals have their hands on all the levers: education, publication, sustenance and reward"

"What we hear too frequently in today's poetry is the shrunken, diminished voice of the professional addressing his or her collegues."

as to the phenomena of prosification and defictionalization:

"It's the profession's way of redefining art downward to accommodate its talent pool."

He doesn't dismiss prose poetry out of hand, citing Blake, Poe and Baudelaire as some of its early practitioners. Also identifies Russell Edson as a brilliant, contemporary prose poet. So it seems he believes the form
has legitimacy, unlike Lang Po:

 "...A sub-species of nonsense verse that allows spiritually exhausted professionals to continue to publish by turning what was once a communicative art into a hermetic game."

Ouch. btw, I googled Russell Edson, some poetry and an interview. Interesting guy.

Would be great if the author responds to your
letter.
Chris
Mar/11/2009, 9:38 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
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Yep. Chrisfriend. Or, as you say, "that's it." The Alpaugh article was kind of interesting to me because, as mentioned upthread, I touched upon the problem a bunch of years ago. It was in '90 or '91. (It seems like another lifetime and another planet now.) I never tried to publish the essay, actually it amounted to a monograph, because while I felt the ideas were sound I also felt it needed more evidence, evidence I didn't have the time or the wherewithall to hunt out. Now, it strikes me as interesting that the problem identified back then keeps as a problem. My sense then was that the problem identified by Williams many years ago, that poetry had been handed back over to the academy, had worsened. That through creative writing programs, the MFA shtick, poetry had been turned into a kind of industrial art predicated on mass manufacture. My antidote was to, so to speak, completely unendow the college of American poets and to return poetry back to its proper industry, that of a cottage industry. In the cottage industry the artisan tends to work alone, or in tandem, and the manufacture is the product of an individual, not that of the committee.

Am I making any sense? Goodness. I am sounding like some sort of retro, William Morris artisan. Or worse. A pre-Raphaelite.

About the Lang-Po stuff I would have spoken more categorically than does Alpaugh. I don't want poetry denatured. I want poetry that speaks to my whole body.

Tere
Mar/11/2009, 7:28 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Tere,

Do you have a copy of that old article around?
I'd like to read it. Probably too late to unendow the college of American poets though.

Chris
Mar/12/2009, 8:18 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
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Chrisfriend, the article is a good 90 pages long plus footnotes. In '91 I was still a typewriter typer. A couple of years later I got it on a word processor, a generation before PC. If you want I can carry over to the board the two to three pages devoted to the academacian of poetry. The whole of the monograph treats with 20th C. American poetry.

Let me know if you are interested and I will type the pertinent stuff to the screen.

Tere
Mar/12/2009, 7:05 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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I'd like it very much, Tere, if it's not too much trouble.

thanks,

Chris
Mar/12/2009, 8:54 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
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Well, Chrisfriend, it is a rainy Saturday afternoon and I feel like revisiting the article. Let me set a scene.

The essay is called "Modern American Poetics," and it treats with three generations (more or less) of American poets starting with the generation born in the late 19th C (Pound and others). It follows through the first 70 years of the 20 C. Viewed as an age I marked off the period of Modern American poetry between the years 1914 and 1976. The first year saw Pound's anthology of Imagist verse. The second year saw John Ashberry awarded honors for his "Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror." The reasons for working inside the two years are several, but the explanation would be a bit convoluted. I'll leave it for now. Here then are three plus pages that address what we are calling the professionalization of poetry. (I'll be the first to admit the text is short on evidence and too broad in brushtroke.

Turning from the Beats, the next area in which is found a source of bad poetry is the practice of Academic poetry. Within the general heading of which can now be added that strangest of all brainchildren, "workshop" poetry.

For the sake of the discussion, the term Academic poet can be taken here to refer to the poet who is employed by a university or a college, who practices the art with a view to publication, who may accept students wishing to learn how to make poetry, or who may, instead, teach the study of poetics. The term "workshop" poetry is used to describe the peculiar institution of versification when it is practiced in a classroom, seminar, symposium, or a writers' colony, admittance to which normally requires remittance of payment, and where the poet's attendance is for the purpose of learning how to write good poetry. A qualifying distinction can be made between a poetry workshop and both poetry readings and the variety of 'Poets' Nights' of which Stephen Mallarme's 'Tuesday Nights' remains the immortal example.

At the present time in the 20th Century's last decade, the number of Academic poets and workshop practitioners is myriad. And, so far as I can determine, it is primarily Academic poets and workshop practitioners who received both professional recognition and the vocational opportunities engendered by such recognition. It is therefore to be surmized that these same practitioners may find themselves with an interest, not entirely selfless, in what gross generalities might be drawn around the topic of Academic poetry. With this in mind, and for the sake of clarification, I should like to state, first, that it is as much the idea as it is the institution of Academic poetry that I find untenable. And second that, in spite of what observations I make, I am familiar with the verse of good poets who, by definition, qualify for inclusion as Academic poets.

To begin with, the stages whereby Academic poetry has developed are three. The first stage occurred prior to the Second World War when poets and theorists such as John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, and T.S. Eliot sought to impart their ideas, on the nature of good poetry, through the academy. Both Ransom and Tate would spend a large part of their careers teaching poetics inside the ivy walls of American universities. And, from across the Atlantic, Eliot would promulgate his notion that the technical perfections and intellectual beauties of such Elizabethan verse makers as John Donne should be emulated. To again use the words of William Carlos Williams, Eliot's persuasion of what constituted good verse "would hand poetry back to the Academy." As has already been shown, the immediate result of this stage was the literary theories of the New Critics. Many of whom would spend their careers in a university environment, and whose domination of poetic ideas, by 1950, would be perceived by some as a strangle hold on the American poetry scene. It is tempting to characterize the efforts of these academicians as reactionary. Allen Tate, in fact, was a self-declared reactionary in his social values and literary tastes. As for T.S. Eliot, there remains his famous self-assessment of being "an Anglo-Catholic in religion, a classicist in literature, and a royalist in politics." Even with Ransom, in whom one finds the humanist of good faith, there is the agrarian reactionary. What one is led to believe is that, in its inception, American Academic poetry was a compensatory act for the social, political, and moral changes attending upon the im-balacing acts of early 20th Century America. This, at least, is how I read the psychology of the anachronistic, closed-form emphasis in verse making of the company.

The second stage to be observed came subsequent to the Second World War. While groups such as the Inscape poets, the Black Mountain folk, and the Beats were stirring in their first poetic notions, there were also a number of poets attending various universities and colleges for the sake of learning how to make poetry. Nor can a clear distinction be made, in this respect, between the poets of the several groups and those for whom the college circuit would become a career. For example, Robert Lowell had been a student of John Crowe Ransom. W.D. Snodgrass would become an academician, as would Robert Creeley and Robert Duncan. And Charles Olson was easily at home at Harvard University as he was at Black Mountain college. Of the poets who could be included in the list of Academic versifiers, there are three more who had studied under Ransom: Anthony Hecht, Randall Jarrell, and James Wright. Furthering the list of the second stage Academic poets, one finds a veritable directory of those who, in the twenty-five year period following the war, would become anthologized. William Stafford, Reed Whittemore, Theodore Roethke, Richard Wilbur, James Dickey, John Logan, Louis Simpson, Edgar Bowers, Donald Justice, A.R. Ammons, John Woods, Galway Kinnell, and X.J. Kennedy, all of whom are poets who have devoted much of their career to teaching. And with most of them having devoted efforts to teaching other poets the sense of good verse.

My intention is not to critically appraise the works of the poets here mentioned. With many of them, in fact, one can find the silver poet's verse deserving to be anthologized again in the next century. It does seem to me, however, that the academic occupation to which they have contributed their careers, what would become a veritable industry, can indeed be critically appraised. But before doing so, the schematic of the Academic development needs to be completed. And so there is the third stage, that of the "workshop" phenomenon that arose in the 1950's, what would also include the Creative Writing Program, where poets and students of poetry have enjoined themselves with the intention of becoming professional, publishable versifiers. What once had been a cottage industry, by means of the "workshop" stage would be transformed into an academic factory of verse making. I am again put in mind of the descriptive metaphor employed early on in these pages, that of carbonic maceration.

The queerest of all notions has to be that true poetry can ever come out of the classroom and the committee. The term of true poetry here being employed is derived from the Gravesean sense of the True Poetic Theme of love, life, and death. The 14th Century French poet, Francois Villon, found his treatment of the theme in the boisterous and high smelling streets of Paris, as would Charles Baudelaire a half a millennium later. Shelley found his treatment of the theme from one corner of the European subcontinent to another. Wordsworth found his in the wild solitude of northern England. Goethe found his in the resonance of his own pagan soul. And Emily Dickinson found her treatment in the furious activities of one woman's enclosed, and spritual, garden. This is just how it is with the haunts where poetry will find the home-feeling warming it in color, form, and sense. In the classroom, however, all one can ever hope to do is study, perhaps even replicate, the specimens of verse. By this I mean that it is simply not possible to create a living expression of lively content in an isolated environment. A statement, it seems, that would more readily find assent among scientists than among the lists of Academic versifiers. In the sciences, at least, the distinction is usually insisted upon between a laboratory produced specimen of phenomonal processes and what is to be found thriving in the real world of possibilities and unknowns. All the more, then, should such a distinction be made between a classroom generated aesthetic and an aesthetic nurtured in natural conditions.

My persuasion is that poetry must participate in the cultural ken, not the caretaker's glen, if it is to be a lively, expressive means of poetic perception. Because it is a living thing, and following the morphology of birth, growth, maturity, decay, and rebirth, poetry will always find its birthing field in the organic context of the poet's engagement between the sensual world and the suprasensual experience of perception. By finding its rhythms in the living language, even when modelling itself on ancient patterns, by newly cutting fresh images, even if it may be impelled by past expressions, by growing the metaphors that satisfy the rebirthing soul, and by discovering its own correspondences that are elastic, responsive, and newly fashioned, this is how poetry makes itself necessary. The meaning here is not that poets should dispense with the past. They are, after all, medial. Nor that poetry is to be discovered in the meeting place. Poets will probably always return to some deep lair, or to some deeper garden, where furious silences nurture their own image loud voices. Unless, of course, they are more at home in the open air, or, even, in the Speak Easy. The meaning is rather, and to say it again, that poetry is an alembic, a pot bellied medium, in which all things must mix for there to be the seperating out of the alchemical verse.

From the "workshop" aspect of Academic poetry there has come an artificially created circumstance that has resulted in the strangest of the occupation's strange features. This is the Workshop poet, also the garduate of the Creative Wring Program, who comes out of the seminars a certified, professional poet entitled to the name. And if one is foolish enough to inform the professional poet that Goethe was a septegenarian before he realized he was a poet, that the Irishman Yeats was in his sixth decade before he authenticated an original voice, or that Emily Dickinson was never quite sure if poetry was her vocation, the response is one of incomprehension. I confess that the whole arrangement of "workshop" poetry is difficult to take seriously. But the consequences have become quite serious in so far as the production of so many versifiers has trivialized the art, has, in fact, devalued the medium. Having been encouraged in the false impression that the true theme requires very little effort, that the voice is not essential, or that the undefinable, qualitative distinction between prose and poetry is actually definable and, therefore, dispensable, the "workshop" poet is at least saved public embarrassment through being received by other "workshop" poets. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule here drawn. Anne Sexton, whose life was that of the luna moth courting the flame, must remain as the most striking of the exceptions. In general, however, I find that the case of the "workshop" poet is as I've described it. One might also say that, since the Academic acceptance of Olsonean open-form poetry, the situation has deteriorated even further. The one feature of the Williams/Olson aesthetic that is least definable, the "field of energy" that good poetry creates for itself, is what seems to be most scarcely found in "workshop" verse since 1970.

After everything has been considered, there was probably only a single mistake that was made by the Academic poets. As understandable as is the desire for regular employment and security, and some few of the second stage poets home from the war with a G.I. bill in their pockets, it is still not clear if the poet can have both occupational endowment and poetry. And when looking in the overview at the enire career of Academic poetry, I am reminded of one of Edward Gibbons more acerbic remarks in his history of the Roman Empire. Speaking of the Augustan Age, he mentions that Octavius Augustus would spend a great deal of money on the arts and on higher learning, but with nothing of any moment to come of it.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There you go, Chrisfriend and other friends. Boy. I haven't read any portion of this essay in years, well over a decade. While maybe I've developed further the particulars of my argument against Academic poetry, I find I haven't changed my mind regarding its harmful effects on the scene. I am convinced you cannot make a poet a poet, no matter the desire. I am convinced that poetry is a cottage industry, not an assembly line manufacture. I am convinced that the whole historical develoment of Academic poetry has devalued the art. Lastly, I am convinced that the whole phenomenon is little more than an institutionalized means of gainful employment for poets. It is like a Depression era Works Project for poets.

One footnote. The essay makes use of a metaphor involving something called carbonic maceration. A good thirty to forty years ago French winemakers discovered a fermenting method that saves much time. Rather than allowing wine to ferment through the natural conversion of sugars into alcohols some bright soul discovered the process can be forced, and sped up, through hermetically sealing the wine and then pumping carbon dioxide into the vat. When I was in the wine business I got to where I could identify a wine carbonically macerated with the first sip. It all tastes the same. Distinguishing characteristics between regions, soil compositions, and grape varietals are eradicated. The wine tastes like alcoholic kool-aid, with no instrinsic interest, no mystery, no signature. How is that for a metaphor describing Academic and "workshop" poetry?

Tere

One more thing. This is all typed to the screen, each paragraph reread in progress. Please make allowance for the typos.

Tere again

Last edited by Terreson, Mar/14/2009, 3:13 pm
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Re: Professionalization of poetry


Thank you, Tere. I've read it through once and
want to read it again before responding.

Chris


Mar/14/2009, 5:11 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
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Tere,

Seems like you and Alpaugh are in agreement re:
academic poetry. I'm glad to have this high-lighted and clarified. I've sensed it for some time in the literature I've been reading but wasn't able to understand the phenomenon.

Do you think it's the sterile, "hermetic," environment of academia which is the problem?
Maybe it's the intrusion of the workshop, its
values and demands, into the creative process of writers. Seems like the best thing to be said for having a day job is how it leaves a person's creative process alone...out of complete indifference. Indifference can be a very benign and helpful
thing.

Chris
Mar/15/2009, 8:19 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
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Well, Chrisfriend, first the caveat. I'll be the first to admit how self-defeating it is to judge things categorically. There are always exceptions to every rule, right? The essay mentions Anne Sexton as one such exception who attended workshops in Boston conducted by Robert Lowell. According to account she was one who actually thrived in the workshop environment. So much so that apparently she tended to dominate the proceedings to Lowell's irritation. Perhaps it was due to her manic tendencies. And also as mentioned Lowell himself had been a student of Ransom's, even if he would break with his teacher's prosodic dictates with his Life Studies collection. Also, according to Carolyn Kizer, the poet Theodore Roethke was, in fact, a gifted teacher of poetry. I am sure the list of exceptions could go on. Then again Sexton, Lowell, Roethke, and Kizer themselves are exceptions.

On the other hand, yes. It is the sterility of the environment that strikes me as its salient. Or, put pithily, it's kind of like what Vonnegut said about his teaching days, what I've mentioned before: 'all those bright young writers and with nothing to write about.' And too it seems to me what mostly gets created is a sameness of voice. So much so there is little to distinguish one product of the classroom and workshop from another. Same voice. Same tonal modulations. Even much the same subject matter. By way of contrast, and this to me is key, think of the differences, say, between the poetry of Jeffers, Pound, Frost, Hart Crane, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Sarah Teasdale, all whom were of the same generation and much the same or similar milieu.

Truth be told what I really think is that the poetry class, the poetry workshop, and the creative writing program are in place less for the student and more for the teacher. It is like a gig offering regular employment, which makes the whole arrangement rather disengenuous. Maybe I am wrong. But this is how it seems to me.

I am sitting here thinking how perturbed I was when writing this part of the essay those many years ago. Damn near twenty years ago. Now I could care less one way or another. And maybe there are good reasons for the arrangement I don't get and can't see. I am also thinking of one person I've met online who is an MFA participant and a damn fine poet who excells especially in prose poetry. But, then, she went back to school after a good 25 years of living, which has to make a difference.

Tere
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Terreson & Chris,

I read the exchange above and read Mr. T's couple of pages. I intend next to read the essay Mr. T posted. All very interesting. It brings to mind my walking into a library and being amazed at the multitude of chapbooks and so forth on the shelves, chapbooks of poets I had never heard of. But I guess that doesn't matter, because what matters is that those people were expressing themselves, even if they weren't elevated in fame with Dante and Shakespeare.

But you do trigger a thought that comes to me on occasion. That is, on both TCP and probably here people are busily sending out poems to get published. It's an attempt to join that community coming out of the workshops, or is it an intersection of those workshops and these on-line communities. We know many are being published on-line, as in Lily, for example, but many also send their material to the hardcover presses. I've tried that myself maybe two or three times in my life. They weren't overwhelmed with my talent, apparently. Didn't recognize me on first sight.

Anyway, just wanted to point out that there is, in fact, an intersection. Or is there? Thanks for the conversation, Zak
Mar/16/2009, 4:35 pm Link to this post Send Email to Zakzzz5   Send PM to Zakzzz5
 
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Good point, Zakman. I've been thinking along similar lines recently. I don't know if the relationship between the two communities can be characterized as occupying an intersection, or an interstice, or perhaps it is a partial overlap. But there seems to be some commerce between the two; which leads me to wonder about a few things. If, as I suspect, the workshop circumstance comes with internalized, maybe institutionalized, problems, do they carry over to the online poetry communities? Do the same bad habits cross over? Is what I call a sameness of voice getting promoted online too, especially on boards where a few dominating critics, and cliques, set a certain tone? (This I worry about a lot.) At the other end of the spectrum do the poetry boards, say, offer a chance for the democratization of poetry not entirely available in the classroom and workshop? Could it amount to terra incognito? Just some of my thoughts your comments flush out.

Tere
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Terreson,

Yeah, I'll think about this today. The one board where I've posted for some time has a number of people who are publishing. Mostly what you hear about is on-line publishing. I have not followed that scene in a while, since I went back to work full-time. But kudos are spread all around when someone is published. I think there's some of that here, too. And certainly, it's an accomplishment, if that is what was sought. I brought the question up to a professor friend of mine (there it is: the Academic) who has been much published in the hard-cover press. As a side-note, I should mention that his poetry is "less" academic, and more down-to earth than most of the poets I read in TCP. That might be an exception, unless your earlier discussion was not about how "down-to-earth" a poet could be. I think in your discussion you were describing the "uniformity", the strictures that were put on by the academy. Or did I get it wrong?

Anyway, I asked this professor/poet about the merits of on-line publishing versus hardcover publishing, and of course he said hardcover was looked upon as being more worthwhile. I lady we both knew, who used to post in TCP more or less stated the same thing.

I don't know how I got off on this tangent. I think it had something to do with our discussion of the intersection of on-line versus the academy, and whether one was impacting the other and how. I tend to agree that we are in uncharted territory. However, it may be that on-line publishing was over-hyped. Kind of like the early promise that the internet would be a big advantage for authors. In fact, it rarely works that way because to succeed in on-line publishing you still have to attract a large number of "eyeballs." And there are hundreds of thousands of sites out there competing for those eyeballs. In fact, I recently heard that the advantage has actually gone to the "booksellers" and not to the individual authors.

Sorry for going off on another tangent. I need another cup of coffee. Was going to go get a haircut, but now I have a slight head cold, and am going to wait an hour or so to decide. Nice talking to you gentlemen. It would be nice to have this much time all the time (he says, ignoring the list his wife left him to do this week. emoticon Thanks. Zak
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In his recent article "Should creative writing be taught?" Louis Menand writes:

"Creative-writing programs are designed on the theory that students who have never published a poem can teach other students who have never published a poem how to write a publishable poem. The fruit of the theory is the writing workshop, a combination of ritual scarring and twelve-on-one group therapy where aspiring writers offer their views of the efforts of other aspiring writers."

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2009/06/08/090608crat_atlarge_menand

I was reminded of this thread you started a while back, Tere. Thought you might find this excerpt of interest:

quote:

The University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop is the most renowned creative-writing program in the world. Sixteen Pulitzer Prize winners and three recent Poet Laureates are graduates of the program. But the school’s official position is that the school had nothing to do with it. “The fact that the Workshop can claim as alumni nationally and internationally prominent poets, novelists, and short story writers is, we believe, more the result of what they brought here than of what they gained from us,” the Iowa Web site explains. Iowa merely admits people who are really good at writing; it puts them up for two years; and then, like the Wizard of Oz, it gives them a diploma. “We continue to look for the most promising talent in the country,” the school says, “in our conviction that writing cannot be taught but that writers can be encouraged.”



The debate goes on.
Jun/12/2009, 7:23 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
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Oh, thank you, Katfriend, for bringing the thread back to the surface. I had pretty much forgotten about it. It is fun to read the exchange with Chrisfriend and, briefly, with Zakman. It is also fun to read again the excerpt from that long ago unpublished monograph of mine, which, one of these days, I must do something about. While the writing style is entirely too self-conscious, I think I can still stand behind its ideas.

So listen, Katfriend, Chrisfriend, Zackman, and anyone else silly enough to be reading, when it comes to the professionalization of poetry I want a clean break from both the Academy and from the offices of professional poetry. I want a divorce. I do not ask for alimony. And I do not want child support. Nor do I want the endowments that a guilt ridden and compromised state-corporate-society bestows on its artists, looking to make us party to their crimes. I do not want public assistance or corporatally manipulated profit. It all amounts to this: a dance with the devil. And nobody can tell me that the dance is not made at the price of an artist's soul.

What I do want is this: the unendowed college of poets. I want back poetry before poets got defined as such by virtue of their positions. And I want something else back. I want the gifted poetry reader back without whom there is no poetry in the first place.

Tere
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Tere,

A thought provoking wish list. Count me in.

Chris
Jun/14/2009, 11:55 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
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Re: Professionalization of poetry


Tagging Chrisfriend now.

Tere
Jun/14/2009, 4:34 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 


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