Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo


runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Cummings the painter


This is so important. No one can get the poetry of Cummings until taking in his paintings. It is worth noting he was best known alive as a painter, not as a poet.

http://eecummingsart.com/

Tere
Oct/2/2008, 6:15 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
ChrisD1 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Oh these omni-creative people! But Tere, I don't understand how the poetry has to be read in the context of the art work.

Say more?

Chris
Oct/9/2008, 1:17 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Chrisfriend, I figure that how Cummings saw things impacted how he said things. And I figure how he said things were pictures, figurative, bodied out, even more than they were statements. Cummings was a picturalist first, a poet second. He wanted you and me to see what he saw. He did one particular series called "Noise." There he was looking to body out sound in his paintings in a way similar to how he bodied out the visual in his poetry.

Tere
Oct/9/2008, 7:09 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Patricia Jones Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Incredibly, Tere, I was not aware that he painted....and I never got into his poetry. Your post will make me read his poems with new eyes.

Thank you.

Pat

---
"Don't you worry--I ain't evil, I'm just bad".
~Chris Smither~
Oct/9/2008, 11:54 pm Link to this post Send Email to Patricia Jones   Send PM to Patricia Jones
 
ChrisD1 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Pat,

I wonder if there is some creative intersection
for you between the visual art and the writing?

I don't know how else to ask that question so I
hope it makes sense to you.

Chris
Oct/10/2008, 6:01 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Patricia Jones Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


I don't know how to answer either, Chris, except to say for sure there is an intersection...one feeds the other for me. I have no other way to describe it. As a reader, I respond most to poems that are visually descriptive, poems I can "see" first then "feel". Not sure that makes me a good reader ...alas....or a good poet.

Just back from England and Scotland. I took several photos in Edinburgh of an autumn leaf wrapped around a stone with a red rubberband and left for someone to find in a park. My companion asked why I was taking photos of something that I could find anywhere, with nothing to note that it was Scotland. I said because I will know and it was left there for me to see...he laughed, of course. Most do... : )

I bet you all will see that leaf and stone surface in more than one medium. : )

Pat

---
"Don't you worry--I ain't evil, I'm just bad".
~Chris Smither~
Oct/10/2008, 11:29 pm Link to this post Send Email to Patricia Jones   Send PM to Patricia Jones
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Creative intersections. I can speak to Pat's creativity, without I hope speaking FOR her, by mentioning that her house is full of creativity. There are paintings and art and objects and little inspirational things wherever you go, even in the bathroom, and especially out in the garden. One finds a hidden gem that always catches one by surprise.

My point is that being fully immersed in a creative life in this way, I for one make no distinction between artistic media. They're all art, and they all serve to fulfill the creative function. From what I've read of Cummings' critical writings and autobiographical sketches, I believe he knew this quite well.

It's also how I function as a multi-genre artist. I've written about it several times before, for whatever that's worth:

Shopping for a New Creative Process 2

Artistic Veering

Limitations

Life Changing Events and Art

There's more, but, well, you get the idea.

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/11/2008, 12:22 pm Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
ChrisD1 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


So Pat and Dragon,

Sounds like working in more than one medium expands the ability to perceive first...then finds its way into creative outlets (?)

I envy you both for the fact your creativity is not limited to language. "crop rotation" what a wonderful concept.

Chris























Oct/11/2008, 1:16 pm Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


quote:



Just back from England and Scotland. I took several photos in Edinburgh of an autumn leaf wrapped around a stone with a red rubberband and left for someone to find in a park. My companion asked why I was taking photos of something that I could find anywhere, with nothing to note that it was Scotland. I said because I will know and it was left there for me to see...he laughed, of course. Most do... : )

I bet you all will see that leaf and stone surface in more than one medium. : )/quote]

I look forward to seeing it! Share! emoticon

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/11/2008, 2:51 pm Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


I pulled off my shelf this morning and was reading through

"AnOther E.E. Cummings," edited by Richard Kostelanetz

This selected emphasizes the more experimental and avant-garde poet, and also ties closely the arrangement of the words on the page to the visual aspects of him being a painter. It completely turns on its head the notion that Cummings wrote most sentimental verse weirdly arranged. Some of the stuff in here echoes Stein, and some of it prefigures what Charles Olson was trying to get at with his notions of open field poetry.

Highly recommended.

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/12/2008, 3:20 pm Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


quote:

ChrisD1 wrote:

So Pat and Dragon,

Sounds like working in more than one medium expands the ability to perceive first...then finds its way into creative outlets (?)

I envy you both for the fact your creativity is not limited to language. "crop rotation" what a wonderful concept.

Chris



Chrisfriend, there is also something to be said for limiting yourself to one medium, putting all of yourself into that one medium. As wonderful as are Cummings' paintings they amount to a historical footnote on his aesthetic development. His poetry outlives him, in part because of what he captioned on canvas. But his paintings were dated before he was dead.

Tere
Oct/13/2008, 4:45 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Patricia Jones Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


First of all, I want to thank the Dragon for his keen eye. Many, if not most, who come to my home miss the things he sees. That is great fun for me when someone comments on them.

Secondly, Chris, I don't disagree with Tere. At the moment, my muse(s) is/are on a cruise. If any of you should run in to one or both, please tell them to come home. Serving more than one or even one with two different interests may not be as productive as serving one with a passion/focus. I just do what works best for me. I haven't written or done any "real" artwork for over a year now...I tend to blame time constraints/demands but I am thinking maybe the muse is trying to tell me something about ignoring her nagging. Or perhaps she's already given up on me and found another, less fickle artist/poet to bless. : )

Pat

---
"Don't you worry--I ain't evil, I'm just bad".
~Chris Smither~
Oct/14/2008, 2:02 am Link to this post Send Email to Patricia Jones   Send PM to Patricia Jones
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Gonna be the voice of disagreement here, as might have been predicted. Limiting oneself to one artform, and becoming expert at it, is what people have been telling me to do all my life. Well, that's fine, for anyone who wants to go that route. A lot of people do, to good effect. But I never have, and have never been able to. Working in multiple media has been very good to me.

Crop rotation is what works for me. There are times when I don't write a poem for months, even a year or two at a time. (Except haiku, which always seem to be floating around, in this floating world.) I've known for a long time that when I have access to musical satisfaction, I don't write many poems. (Some poets seem to feel that this is somehow a betrayal of the Art of Poetry; but they still like my poems; so go figure.) When I'm out in the wild, with little or no access to technology, I write a lot in my handwritten journal; and I usually write a lot of poems.

Some of this is nothing more than habit of practice. What I've done is observe my own process enough to know something of how it works. I;m aware that there is a huge non-specific force of creativity available to me on a continuous basis. That force has several channels available to it that it can come through. Those channels can switch, sometimes more than one can be "on" at a time, sometimes one predominates. But the creative force is always coming through. At least that's how it works for me. The other thing I've learned is to not to try to force it or direct it where I think it "should" be, but rather be receptive and let it go wherever it wishes. My job is to always be ready, and to keep all my tools polished and ready to go.

The point is, I make art, or music, or a poem, every single day. I've made something every single day for several decades. You can imagine what a stockpile or back catalog that leaves me with. The fact that they're not all in the same media bothers me not even slightly. I have several bodies of work, and more than one of them has been successful. I'm not someone who believes that awards matter that much, or mean that much, nonetheless I have received them. So, somebody likes my work, scattered, prolific, and "unfocused" as it is. Those have all been terms thrown my way—as though "prolific" were somehow a pejorative, too.

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/14/2008, 8:42 am Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
ChrisD1 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


I read something by Mary Oliver in which she compared the unconscious, creative part (I'm paraphrasing) to a lover. If we are reliable and show up on schedule, that part will meet us
bearing gifts. If not, well...

Speaking for myself, I haven't been showing up lately. Maybe this works the same for omni-creative people as well as one-trick-ponies
like me. I think Ms. Oliver's right; after I show up for a while, I do get rewarded. I wonder if we're all just too riveted by the world lately. Gotta admit, we're living in interesting times.

Chris
Oct/14/2008, 8:51 am Link to this post Send Email to ChrisD1   Send PM to ChrisD1
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Very good points about showing up, Chris.

Do you know the full form of the ancient Chinese curse? It goes:

May you live in interesting times, may your children move back in with you, and may the government always know where you are.

emoticon

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/14/2008, 10:34 am Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Dragonman, there is no disagreement on the topic. Every artist has her or his own way. I mean Michelangelo is best known for his sculptures and for his painting. Little known is that he perfected the Italian sonnet. Chris has her way, you have yours, Pat has hers. Hell, forty years ago I was first chair trumpet in school and I had a voice just this side of baritone mahogany perfect. I let it all go when I wrote my first poem at age 16.

So many ways artistically. All of them the right way.

Tere
Oct/14/2008, 7:00 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Patricia Jones Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


My only sister was a piano prodigy. Ten years younger, I was expected to be a pianist too. I took lessons for three years from Dr. Dunsing until she told my parents their money would be better spent on art lessons. My sister, in college by then, as a music major, suddenly said, "no more practice...I will never play again" and, to the best of our knowledge, never has. I, on the other hand, found art to be a constant solace, an outlet, a way to tilt my head, see something differently, solve a life problem...a pursuit I love and am driven to do, but not with the kind of pressure my sister had. I should thank her for her early experience/loss. It certainly resulted in my gain.

I came to write poetry very late...at age 52...63 now, I cannot compete with those of you who have studied, written it for years. Now and then I need to express what I see, what I feel in words. I do not consider myself a poet..never call myself a poet and do not attend local poetry readings and likely never will. I am shy by nature...reading my heart's contents to a bunch of strangers does not trip my trigger. : )

But I sure do love reading your poems, the learning searches you send me off on...and trying my hand at your medium now and then. : )

Truth be known...

Pat

Last edited by Patricia Jones, Oct/14/2008, 11:43 pm


---
"Don't you worry--I ain't evil, I'm just bad".
~Chris Smither~
Oct/14/2008, 11:39 pm Link to this post Send Email to Patricia Jones   Send PM to Patricia Jones
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Actually, Pat, time and again what strikes me about your poems is their pictorial precision. Sometimes you out Image the Imagistes, especially when it comes to the pathos of your poems.

Tere
Oct/16/2008, 6:51 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Patricia Jones Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


That's a mighty fine compliment, Tere. Thank you.

See what he does to us, folks...he's always there fostering us, making us keep at the poetic craft he loves so much. And you know what? With encouragement, many of us do. : )

Thanks again, Tere.

Pat

---
"Don't you worry--I ain't evil, I'm just bad".
~Chris Smither~
Oct/16/2008, 11:04 pm Link to this post Send Email to Patricia Jones   Send PM to Patricia Jones
 
Dragon59 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Cummings the painter


Pat, are you kidding? emoticon It doesn't matter at all that you came to poetry late, you came to it already artistically formed. Somme of your poems have been among the most memorable I've read in the time we've known each other. A few of the Taylor-inspired poems I'll never get out of my head; and that's a good thing.

---
www.arthurdurkee.net
lcgallery.tv
artdurkee.blogspot.com
ruralplainsgay.blogspot.com
Oct/16/2008, 11:39 pm Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 


Add a reply





You are not logged in (login)