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Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Yesterday I stumbled upon this atricle, and knowing that some of you enjoy Cohen's music as much as I do, I thought I'd post it:

quote:

It is, in many respects, a song for every occasion. Rufus Wainwright has said, "It's an easy song to sing. The music never pummels the words. The melody is almost liturgical and conjures up religious feelings. It's purifying." It was not, however, an easy song to write. When he works, Cohen explores every lyrical permutation, sometimes completely finishing verses then discarding them. He claims there are at least 80 verses to Hallelujah. "I filled two notebooks and I remember being in the Royalton Hotel [in New York], on the carpet in my underwear, banging my head on the floor and saying, 'I can't finish this song.'"

He has actually recorded two distinct versions, with almost completely different lyrics, and it is partly this that lends the song its openness to interpretation, as artists mix and match verses. It subtly alters over time to reflect the needs of the moment.

Appropriately, in its original version on Cohen's 1984 album Various Positions, Hallelujah is, partially, about the act of songwriting itself.

. . .

Former Velvet Underground member John Cale helped shape it with his own recording in 1991, when Cohen faxed him 15 pages of lyrics. "I went through and just picked out the cheeky verses," Cale claimed. It was this that Jeff Buckley covered for his 1994 album Grace. Buckley described it as an homage to "the hallelujah of the orgasm".

Though it dispenses with the final redemptive verse, Buckley's recording retains the song's religious character. This is part of its innate appeal, the contrast between its harsh depiction of life and the quality of uplifting transcendence contained in the repeated soaring Hallelujahs.

. . .

"The only advice I have for young songwriters is that if you stick with a song long enough, it will yield," he recently said. "But long enough is not any fixed duration. You might have to stay with it for years and years."



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2008/06/14/bmcohen114.xml

I was wondering if anyone else has any poems or lyrics that have multiple versions, never ending verses?

This observation reminded me of something Caroline wrote recently in another thread: "This is part of its innate appeal, the contrast between its harsh depiction of life and the quality of uplifting transcendence contained in the repeated soaring Hallelujahs."
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Also, I listened to "Leonard Cohen's thoughts on" and found them interesting:

http://leonardcohen.com/video.html
Nov/11/2008, 12:59 pm Link to this post Send Email to Kaitlynn   Send PM to Kaitlynn
 
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


I respect that Cohen hard to work so hard and so long to arrive at something so simple and sublime. It makes me think of St.-Exupery's thought: "A designer knows he has achieved perfection not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away." There is a stripping away.

Having said that, I find this process of working THAT hard to arrive at something simple and pure, to be completely antithetical to the way I work. If I have to work that hard, I know there's something wrong.

And this way of working is a very Western one. It's the opposite of Zen craftsmanship, while superficially being similar in time and effort. The difference is the attitude with which one approaches work: beating it into submission, or going with the flow. I find it ironic that Cohen is attracted to Zen, when he works in a very un-Zen-like way. An interesting paradox.

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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Hi Dragon,

Your comments made me wonder why Cohen was banging his head on the floor. It's hard to tell from the limited comment and context. Was he frustrated because he didn't think he was getting the song "right"? Or was he frustrated because his expectation was that he had had enough material, alright already? Did he think that the universe that creates the 10,000 things was overdoing it by sending him 10,000 verses? emoticon Either way, I guess it amounts to what you said about beating something into submission versus going with the flow.
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I remember something Cohen said in an interview some years ago. He said he once asked Dylan how long he took to write a song lyric. He said Dylan replied, 'about five minutes.' Cohen then said to the interviewer, 'of course he was lying.' Then Dylan asked Cohen the same question. Cohen replied, 'about five years.' Cohen then said to the interviewer, 'of course I was lying too.'

I have very few poems not the product of anywhere from one to twenty years. It is even worse when it comes to my prose. Of two novels I've written, the first novel was rewritten four times. To me it is one thing to have a conception, however beautiful. It is quite another to sculpturally pull out of the stone, so to speak, the perfect, perfectly balanced, shape. The metaphor precisely describes my process. But it may just be I am slow that way.

Tere
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Me, I am just glad he wrote it. It is a favorite of mine.

Pat

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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


You made me go looking. As writers, poets, muscians, don't we wish we could create something so many embrace, will interpret for years in their own style?

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ckbdLVX736U&feature=related

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=T2NEU6Xf7lM&feature=related

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=aaHdeNN_ee0&feature=related

And the saddest one, maybe the one singing it with the most passion that I listen to often:

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=AratTMGrHaQ&feature=related

But the master who wrote it is still kicking too...and Glastonbury is such a magical place. How I would have loved to have been there...two fingers waving in the crowd.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=02Zqy1UnNM4&feature=related

And I would have loved seeing her there, too...I've loved her for so many years now. I don't wear all that silver for nuthin', you know? : )

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=0EVkEL7d8o4&feature=related

Pat



Last edited by Patricia Jones, Nov/14/2008, 1:49 am


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


It's a song I've considered arranging for male chorus. I think there is an arrangement or two out there for mixed chorus.

This does point out some interesting differences in the ways artists work. Not just in terms of duration of effort, but in terms of approach and attitude.

I sometimes feel as if writers who spend so much time re-writing risk killing the life in their work. I'm not saying this about anyone here in this discussion, and I have encountered poets on the boards who achieve such a high degree of polish for their poems that they seem like perfect and lifeless statues. I think one needs to leave in a little chaos, a little rawness, a little breakage and imperfection, so the piece can breathe.

The Navajo always leave a spirit-trail in one of their woven rugs, for example; which is a small imperfection, often in a corner, that breaks the otherwise perfectly symmetrical form. This allows the life to come into and out of the weaving, so that it does not become too perfect, too self-contained, too fixed, and sterile.

I am interested in the fact that Cohen wrestled with this song for so long, but did not succeed in polishing it to death. It still breathes. Maybe he was wrestling with an angel, after all.

But it remains alien, for me, to my own way of working. I wrestle with angels, but not like that. Mostly I learned from Rilke that wrestling with angels doesn't work, you have to give in, and submit, and then they just pour themselves through you.

Fascinating.

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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


he's touring australian in a few weeks- my mum, brother and sister are all going to see him, new years eve, at a lovely venue in the vineyards. Alas, I won't be there, but he's one performer i'd love to see.
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Offered up as a footnote on the Cohen exchange.

I have always been a Cohen man. This is going back to the late sixties and early seventies. And I can still recite from memory many of those early songs. His songs from the eighties I also know. His more recent lyric poetry I know pretty well too. More than that, he is really about the only living lyric poet I feel challenged by when it comes to saying the big and deep things in the true way.

But there is something I've always wondered about, something that has flumoxed me all these thirty plus years.

His poetry, the book stuff, is forgettably bad. Seriously, forgettably bad. The one novel of his I've read (he has written two I know about) is equally as bad. I've never had the sense that in his poetry, the book stuff, he has taken the care, or shown the exquisite instinct for word to sound to meaning connection his songs invariably have. His poetry, the book stuff, comes over as accidental, incidental, inconsequential.

I think Cohen said once, back in the sixties maybe, that he turned to song lyrics because he couldn't make a living at poetry and novels. I think it possible the case is slightly different. I think he didn't find his metier until he turned to writing songs. Once found maybe he became a real workman.

But don't take my word for it. Read Cohen's poetry, the book stuff. Then compare that stuff with his lyric poetry, the song stuff.

Tere
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Reading the books of poems and part of one of his novels is exactly why I have never been convinced of Cohen's genius the way many are. I have never been convinced. I have never thought he was the great poet that many claim him to be. His poetry books are full of clichés and 60s stereotypes. I'm sorry: it's mostly overly-familiar, and not very good. if you didn't know that Leonard Cohen had written it, would you still like it?

But some of the songs ARE brilliant, and wonderful. But they're also songs, not poems.

I know, I know, I'm a minority heretic in my opinion.

In exactly the same way, I have always agreed that Bob Dylan writes great lyrics and great songs. But he is not, and never has been, the "great poet" that so many people claim him to be. (His novel is warmed-over Kerouac, is what I recall from skimming it.) Not to mention that I almost always find his singing mannerisms irritating, and detracting from the song rather than adding to it. (There are some recordings that prove that it IS a mannerism, because he's capable of singing in a normative melodic way if he chooses.)

Far too many poets completely forget that adding music to words takes them to another level, a synergistic level. Songwriting is NOT poetry, and the songwriters whose lyrics work on the page, AS POEMS, as few and far between. I would argue that one or two individual songs by certain songwriters do achieve the on-the-page poem criterion, but not very many. And certainly most songs do not.

Most readers don't realize that when they read they song lyrics on the page, they are still hearing the melody somewhere in their minds, as they read. Words and music in a great song are not separable, because they make one whole. In a great song, as in all great vocal music, words and music are indivisible. This whole "poet" trope ignores that you can't separate the words from the music in a song. It's wishful thinking. And it's just plain inaccurate. Sorry, this is pet peeve of mine. (And don;t me going on the whole cult of personality stuff around this.)

"Hallelujah" a very good song, yes. My favorite performance is still the Jeff Buckley one. So sue me for a heretic. *shrug*

Last edited by Dragon59, Dec/26/2008, 10:09 pm


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


I don't disagree with you, Dragonman. I have no question but that Cohen is the greatest chansonnier since the Belgian poet, Jacques Brel. He far out passes Bob Dylan. Cohen's lyric poetry is seminal. But his poetry, the paper stuff, is dreadful, perfectly forgettable. To me it makes for an interesting conundrum, one over which I've been puzzling for decades. How can such a lyric genius be such a bad poet when it comes to the paper stuff?

Tere
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


I think it's the synergy, as I said.

The truth is, and I say this as a composer and occasional songwriter, and also as a performer, when the words and music come together, both are improved, both are enhanced, and both are made better than they are alone. Singing a poem is a very different experience than reading it, either silently or out loud.

This is as true for a Tom Petty song or a Beatles song as it is for a Leonard Cohen song.

I see no conundrum. It seems obvious to me that the difference is purely and simply the music. He writes better words, period, when he writes them for music. The music makes him write better words.

Again, that's true for a lot of other songwriters, too.

And the expectations for songwriting are different than for pure poetry. The needs are different. There are rhymes and other technical things that would never pass muster as a pure poem but work great in a song, because the music brings even mundane words up to a higher level.

I don't mean to sound like a snob, but I can honestly say, as a composer, that I don't find this to be a conundrum at all. It's the music, period. The music is what makes it work.

I think this might be one of those areas where poets have blinders. It's also why so many poets keep insisting that songwriters are poets, when in fact they're not. Same biases in play. It's like asking a fish to breathe something other than water, maybe. Again, no offense intended; that's just my perspective. Poets sometimes can't see very far out of their box of words. It's something I've seen lots of times, in these sorts of discussions.

So, again, no offense intended to anybody about any of this. The truth is, I have taken a lot of !@#$ about my opinions on this—but most of that !@#$ has frankly come from poets, who don't know anything about songwriting and some of whom are quite non-musical. I genuinely think this is a blind spot. It's like asking many dancers to be verbally articulate: they have a serious blind spot about non-kinesthetic media. So I'm gunshy on this topic when talking to poets about it. But the fact remains: I know a shitload more about music than most poets, and I'm tired of being put on the defensive about it. (Or much else, for that matter.) Most of you, even you guys here, who know me better than most, have no real idea how much more central music is to my life than poetry—and also have no idea of my musical credentials, which in fact are pretty !@#$ serious. Honestly, none of that matters to my ego, it's just facts that are relevant to my argument at the moment. Anyway. I'll shut up about it now.

Last edited by Dragon59, Dec/27/2008, 2:03 am


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Most of you, even you guys here, who know me better than most, have no real idea how much more central music is to my life than poetry—and also have no idea of my musical credentials, which in fact are pretty ****ing serious.

I know, D...but will always regret not having heard you play live. I will regret forever not flying to Iowa that year. Next time you are here, I'm warning you...you're gonna have to play Stick for your dinner for sure. : )

Your talents are so integrated, intertwined that it is difficult to separate music from photography from art from poetry. And it's a gift to us all that we are fortunate to know them all, and sometimes all of them combined in your DVDs. And that's a Hallelujah for sure.

But I have always sensed over many years now that music is your driving force.
Pat

Last edited by Patricia Jones, Dec/27/2008, 3:08 am


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Thanks, Pat.

I had an insight today, after talking to a friend: the reason I've been writing so much lately is because it's a strength issue. I still haven't recovered my strength from the chronic illness diagnosis a year ago. I may never recover it all. I still get tired really fast. The truth is, writing is just easier than anything else. There are whole days where I can't do anything at all. But I can still write.

My friend knows a guy who's an army vet, and destroyed his back, and is on disability now. He took up writing as something to do, while he couldn't do anything else. He's published, and fairly good at it. I feel like I understand his change of life rather well, though, because even though I really don't think of myself as a writer, now or ever, I seem to be doing it more than anything else, lately, because it's the only thing I CAN do every day.

Enough self-pity, though. This too colors my attitude on these subjects, I freely admit it. Frustrated? Me? Never. What, never? No, never. What, never? Well, hardly ever. . . .

Last edited by Dragon59, Dec/27/2008, 3:30 am


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Thousands

Out of the thousands
who are known,
or who want to be known
as poets,
maybe one or two
are genuine
and the rest are fakes,
hanging around the sacred precincts
trying to look like the real thing.
Needless to say
I am one of the fakes,
and this is my story.

Leonard Cohen
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


A NOTE TO THE READER

from the Foreword to the Chinese edition
of "Beautiful Losers"

"This is a difficult book, even in English, if it is taken too seriously. May I suggest that you skip over the parts you don't like? Dip into it here and there. Perhaps there will be a passage, or even a page, that resonates with your curiosity. After a while, if you are sufficiently bored or unemployed, you may want to read it from cover to cover. In any case, I thank you for your interest in this odd collection of jazz riffs, pop-art jokes, religious kitsch and muffled prayer, an interest which indicates, to my thinking, a rather reckless, though very touching, generosity on your part.

Beautiful Losers was written outside, on a table set among the rocks, weeds and daisies, behind my house on Hydra, an island in the Aegean Sea. I lived there many years ago. It was a blazing hot summer. I never covered my head. What you have in your hands is more of a sunstroke than a book.

Dear Reader, please forgive me if I have wasted your time."

http://www.leonardcohenfiles.com/bl-chinese.html

Can't say that I disagree with the assessments offered here. I think Dragon has it right when he says that many people who read song lyrics as poetry still hear the rhythm of the song in their heads while they read. As much as I love the song, even "Hallelujah!" works better as a lyric than as a poem. One thing that I do think Cohen captures in many of his poems is a kind of rawness and honesty that is often lacking in more polished work. I also think that both Cohen and Dylan often speak to the zeitgeist in a way that gives their best work an extra lift and may account for the appeal and staying power of those songs.
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


quote:

I also think that both Cohen and Dylan often speak to the zeitgeist in a way that gives their best work an extra lift and may account for the appeal and staying power of those songs.



I think you're absolutely correct about this.

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Dragonman, this is one of those few times I have to disagree. And I just now discover I can tell you exactly, precisely why.

I've heard the explanation you give before, or how it is the music can, so to speak, make the lyric-viewed-as-poem. It is straight forward. It even has the advantage of being an occam's razor kind of moment in which the simplest explantion is considered the most likely to be the truest. But I don't buy it. First off, Cohen's melodies are not all that spectatcular. They even tend to be repetitive, as do his chord progressions. They tend to set a mood or a tone is about the best I can say about his melodies. Mood is frequently the same. I don't mean this critically. Cohen has always put his chord progressions to good effect. And yet, about ten years ago Cohen himself said that, for long, studio musicians tended to be indifferent to his scores. They certainly don't offer musicians much of an opportunity for the musical expression.

But here is what I find in his lyrics I do not find in his poetry, the book stuff. Simply put, I find an unmistakable poetry of thought, something I've mentioned before in other contexts, and I do not find it in his book stuff. To my mind, this is what makes his song lyrics, not the music. This is what makes his lyrics beautiful, essential, drawn out of the gut, and carrying over to where I get it in the gut. I have never once gotten the same visceral resonance in his book stuff. And I say this knowing that when it comes to poetry of thought he is still my master. I think there is a reason why so many women vocalists have covered him over the years, starting with Judy Collins back in the sixties. And I think it has to do with a certain immediate, involuntary, even gestalt response to the whole of what he says in his lyrics. Not how he says what he says, but what he says. And I think the nature of what he says in his lyrics is this thing I call poetry of thought.

Above I suggested that maybe in song lyrics Cohen found his metier. I am even more persuaded that he did.

Thanks, man, for the continued exchange. I think I got an answer to what has been bugging me for decades. Still the disjunct puzzles me, even with answer in hand. Thus the conundrum.

And now I am going back through the mental catalogue. I cannot think of one poem, the book stuff, equivelent in size or in depth to Suzanne, Joan of Arc, Famous Blue Raincoat, all the way and fast forwarding to In my Secret Life, A Thousand Kisses Deep, or Alexandria.

Tere

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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


k.d. lang sure found a way to express his lyrics musically.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_NpxTWbovE

Pat

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quote:

First off, Cohen's melodies are not all that spectatcular. They even tend to be repetitive, as do his chord progressions. They tend to set a mood or a tone is about the best I can say about his melodies. Mood is frequently the same. I don't mean this critically. Cohen has always put his chord progressions to good effect. And yet, about ten years ago Cohen himself said that, for long, studio musicians tended to be indifferent to his scores. They certainly don't offer musicians much of an opportunity for the musical expression.



Your points serve to reinforce my argument, actually: because the argument was that it is the SYNERGY of words and music together that raise both to a higher level than either has by themselves. Yes, his chords and melodies aren't that special. But neither are they special in most songwriting. Which is not jazz, and tends to be quite simpler than jazz or classical, in terms of music theory. Advanced music theory is actually not typical is great songwriting.

I don't disagree that his words in the songs are at a better level, purely as words, than they are in the books of poems. But could that be a function of the synergy? Perhaps. Because perhaps the artist, knowing he was writing a song rather than a poem, was thinking about the words all along, from the beginning.

In other words, I'm not sure how deeply we disagree.

Last edited by Dragon59, Dec/28/2008, 1:56 am


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I noticed that a number of Cohen songs started out as poems, among them There for You, Because of a Few Songs, The Letters and quite a few from Ten New Songs: By the Rivers Dark, Love Itself, You Have Loved Enough, Alexandra Leaving, Boogie Street and A Thousand Kisses Deep. Of the latter Cohen wrote: "Some of the pieces in this book became lyrics for songs that Sharon Robinson and I wrote and sang together." Of A Thousand Kisses Deep, Cohen wrote:

quote:

"This is getting pretty close. (...) The process has become rather comic. But I think we've got it now. It took the crisis of posting it to your site to force a clarification of the text (after three years of secret tinkering). There is an apparent violation of the metre in some verses (e.g. #4) but the old poets would have justified them with devices such as th'Holy Spirit, or th'Means. And these curiosities actually correspond to the accents of the poem when it is sung. This version represents a distillation of many, many verses, all of them tottering over the final line, A thousand kisses deep. I hope this is an end to it for a while."



http://www.leonardcohenfiles.com/glass.html

Maybe it just comes down to some poems, pieces, being better written than others, comes down to some of them embodying the poetry of thought more fully. Perhaps, in turn, it is those poems that also make the best lyrics. I don't know. It is hard for me to read any of the above mentioned pieces without hearing the rhythm of th songs they became and which I heard before I ever read the poems.

quote:

And I think it has to do with a certain immediate, involuntary, even gestalt response to the whole of what he says in his lyrics. Not how he says what he says, but what he says. And I think the nature of what he says in his lyrics is this thing I call poetry of thought.



Tere, I think it is that quality I was referring to when I said his poems often have a rawness and honesty that is sometimes lacking in more polished pieces.
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


His music is all love poems/songs...sung in a voice that I love and many don't. But thousands of us do respond to them...I think it is the combination of his lyrics, music and delivery. What I love, too, about Cohen, what he's given us, is that so many have performed his music and lyrics even better than he does....not unlike Dylan...no one can sing Forever Young better than Baez... or the Jerry Garcia Band playing Dylan's "Simple Twist of Fate" makes you love Dylan even if you didn't like either of them before you heard it.

When that happens among such diverse fans and listeners, there has to be something in the lyrics that makes the music not only accessible to the masses, but cherished by us as well.

Pat

Last edited by Patricia Jones, Dec/28/2008, 1:22 am


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


There are a few singer-songwriters who write well but don't perform well. Not that they don't play or sing musically, but they don't have great voices, or their vocal mannerisms get in the way. Cohen, Dylan, Neil Young, all fit into this category; and there are others. Well, let's say that there performances are not smooth; maybe they're very good, very emotive and powerful performances, but they do grate on one's musical ears a bit.

The Pretenders do my favorite version of "Forever Young," Chrissie Hynde sings it like no one else can. Jeff Buckley does my favorite version of "Hallelujah," as I said, but there are other good versions. Baez does "Simple Twist of Fate" very well.

A great song can survive many arrangements, many performances. It can even transcend genres, in some cases. There are style-breaking covers of many of the songs already-mentioned, that are at least as good as the original versions; in some cases, maybe better.

I have a jazz CD led by Herbie Hancock that features several guest singers as well as great jazz musicians, all the songs are covers of Joni Mitchell songs, and some of the arrangements are bone-chillingly good.

Sarah McLachlan nail's XTC's song "Dear God" like no one else can.

Tom Waits has a cracked and terrible voice, but he's a better performer than almost any of those already mentioned here. You cannot forget his versions of songs.

Again, a great song is more than just one version, and often the writer is not always the best performer. I'm a heretic, I know, but I've almost never been able to stand listening to Dylan sing. Except with the Traveling Wilburys, with whom he did some great singing.

Last edited by Dragon59, Dec/28/2008, 2:06 am


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Dec/28/2008, 2:03 am Link to this post Send Email to Dragon59   Send PM to Dragon59
 
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


I loved the Traveling Wilburys, too, the music and the fact they came together to do it...sad they were so short-lived.

But then I love musicians few have ever heard of. : )

Here's one of them we lost this year...there will always be a burning spark in my heart for him:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSsXNmj3S5o&feature=related

and one of his last performances, a favorite of his of mine:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWwayDfJtkE&feature=related



Pat

Last edited by Patricia Jones, Dec/28/2008, 3:15 am


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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


In today's SF Chronicle...my favorite columnist:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/01/19/DDQL15BFC6.DTL

Pat

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Here is the best way I can put across what I figure is Cohen's lyrical genius. I figure this is what is at the core of his poetry at its best.

"If they are to succeed, their constitution must contain... the power of wonder that begets wonder, and miracle, and prophecy. They will be egoists and romanticists all, but romantics with the courage of realism: they will put their hands upon the mysterious contour of life not to force meaning out of it... but to press meaning upon it, outstare the stony countenance of it, make it flush with their own colors."

Laura Riding wrote this back in the 1920s. It is from her essay, a manifesto, she called "A Prophecy or a Plea." Her inspiration was her then lover, Hart Crane. (I say lover even though his homosexuality made bedtime impossible for her.) And her prophesy involved poets she thought of as the New Romantics.

Is there any doubt but that Cohen's lyric poetry is the product of an egoist, a Romantic, and a realist? What an effective combination it proves to be in his lyric poetry. I have for long thought that Romantic poetry has kept alive and well in the pop music scene. Cohen proves my point.

Tere
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Is there anything more true and beautiful than this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-myjV64xfs



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Cohen performs the song in London on Maarch 27, 2009:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttv5dyvtF4o&feature=channel
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Re: Leonard Cohen: Hallelujah!


Leonard Cohen turned 75 years old this year. Over at his forum, they have a thread where folks can wish him a happy birthday, thank him for his music, etc. I posted a note to him and thought some of you might like to as well:

http://www.leonardcohenforum.com/index.php?sid=349173e162eb533b3293f372c7110cd7

Go to third forum down, "Leonard Cohen 75 Years."
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