Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo






runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

Page:  1  2  3 

 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Kat,

I'd love to know more about that realization you had while driving...a post, prose piece, poem...just more about that.

Here's something I heard the other day, a quote from Marshall McLuhan:

"Humans are the sex organs of the machine world."

Well, that puts it all into perspective.

Chris

Jun/8/2010, 12:06 pm Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


I'd love to know more about that realization you had while driving...a post, prose piece, poem...just more about that.

Chris,

That comment does need more context, doesn't it? Okay, I'll see what I can do to provide more of a backstory.

In light of the WSJ article I linked to, that McLuhan quote is timely!
Jun/8/2010, 10:06 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


I have been watching episodes of "The World at War":

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071075/

It's a rather daunting and depression exercise but one that puts things in perspective for me in a new way.

A couple of quotes from the documentary reminded me of this thread. Hitler said something to the effect that the individual doesn't matter; what matters is that the nation survives. I can't recall the exact quote, but I found this one that seems to capture the gist of his sentiments:

"It is thus necessary that the individual should finally come to realize that his own ego is of no importance in comparison with the existence of the nation, that the position of the individual is conditioned solely by the interests of the nation as a whole."

http://quotes.liberty-tree.ca/quotes_by/adolf+hitler

In "Red Star," the episode about the siege of Leningrad, when 4,000 Russian cvilians were dying everyday as the result of the bombings, disease and starvation, one woman said that they turned to poetry and it kept them alive.

Woman's comment aroung the 4:45 minute mark:

The World at War - Red Star pt 2 - The Soviet Union 1941- 43

Laurence Olivier reading the poem "Wait for Me," "which thousands of Russians knew by heart," around the 4 minute mark:

The World at War - Red Star pt 3 - The Soviet Union 1941- 43

Ironically, it was nationalism and a fierce determination not to be conquered but to survive, that made the Russian people fight and endure, and made them, according to the documentary, forget, after the siege had ended, all about Stalin's purges before the war.

Hell on earth, and the more things change, the more they stay the same. So now I'm thinking there is such a thing as the collective human soul, as well as the individual human soul.

Last edited by Katlin, Jun/29/2010, 1:42 pm
Jun/28/2010, 3:17 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


On a side note: Watching the series has made me realize Churchill really had a way with words. FDR too. Nationalism at work there too. And now, more than ever, the comparsion of Obama's speech-making abilities to Hitler's are driving me bonkers.
Jun/28/2010, 4:24 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Now this is actually making me think on a bunch of different levels. Need to process.

Tere
Jun/28/2010, 11:51 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


More grist for the mill perhaps:

"Lyric poetry is the form that most explicitly and self-consciously explores the relationship between the construction of the self and the construction of sentences. Its intimacy sets it apart from the novel, and makes it the ultimate expression of a culture’s sensibility—of its most intimate self (or selves).

As such, whether the poet intends it or not, lyric is political."

and:

"Lyric has peculiar connections to truth, to the mechanics of language, and to voice. Those connections present obstacles to piecing together stable political identities within lyric—of any kind, in any language. There is a large body of work that engages those difficulties and attempts to write out of or through identity positions, and to do so as an end in itself. The goals of this “identity work” are to transmit, for example, knowledge about being “Indian” or “Gujarati,” or to define the problems in trying to do so."

From "The Other Mother Tongue" by Michael Scharf:

http://poems.com/special_features/prose/essay_scharf.php
Jun/29/2010, 8:33 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


FYI: I was able to find the "World at War" series on utube, so I put in links to the Russian woman talking about the force of poetry and to Olivier, the narrator of the series, reading several Russian poems that were popular at the time.
Jun/29/2010, 2:08 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Katlin, I have for long thought the lyrical voice is the voice most suited to the Age. It is literature's I/Thou voice and, as such, it is journalistic. Being journalistic, and for lack of a better way of saying it, it can get us inside experience. It can go interior in ways neither the novel or drama can. Similarly, and at this late date, when I turn to the prose model, I turn to Montaigne's example and go with the essay. And for the same reason: looking to get inside experience itself. This is why I resort to our Field Notes forum as frequently as I do. Neither the novel or the short story do it for me anymore. Speaking for myself only, there is something artificial in the constructs of both.

But go easy on me please and don't rat me out to the LangPo camp.

Tere

quote:

Katlin wrote:

More grist for the mill perhaps:

"Lyric poetry is the form that most explicitly and self-consciously explores the relationship between the construction of the self and the construction of sentences. Its intimacy sets it apart from the novel, and makes it the ultimate expression of a culture’s sensibility—of its most intimate self (or selves).

As such, whether the poet intends it or not, lyric is political."

and:

"Lyric has peculiar connections to truth, to the mechanics of language, and to voice. Those connections present obstacles to piecing together stable political identities within lyric—of any kind, in any language. There is a large body of work that engages those difficulties and attempts to write out of or through identity positions, and to do so as an end in itself. The goals of this “identity work” are to transmit, for example, knowledge about being “Indian” or “Gujarati,” or to define the problems in trying to do so."

From "The Other Mother Tongue" by Michael Scharf:

http://poems.com/special_features/prose/essay_scharf.php



Jun/30/2010, 4:04 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
pjouissance Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Haha, Postmodernism is just dead stuff, the roadkill as we drive on. Thrown out the window in defiance of anti-litter laws. Grandpa's old trunk full of uniforms and mystery objects. Who cares? let's get back to the real stuff.

Bland is right.

As the bluesman says, give these people a show. What's wrong with doing that?

Just saying...(in a mood)

Auto
Jun/30/2010, 6:14 pm Link to this post Send Email to pjouissance   Send PM to pjouissance
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Auto,

Haha, Postmodernism is just dead stuff, the roadkill as we drive on.

For some reason, when I read that line, I thought of a line from on old Gerald Stern poem: "you are helping to bury it." I couldn't remember the rest of the poem, but googled it:

"Burying an Animal on the Way to New York"

Don't flinch when you come across a dead animal lying on the road;
you are being shown the secret of life.
Drive slowly over the brown flesh;
you are helping to bury it.
If you are the last mourner there will be no caress
at all from the crushed limbs
and you will have to slide over the dark spot imagining
the first suffering all by yourself.
Shreds of spirit and little ghost fragments will be spread out
for two miles above the white highway.
Slow down with your radio off and your windows open
to hear the twittering as you go by.

The twittering reminded me of how lots of poets tweet these days. Your mention of the bluesman got me thinking that the radio must be blasting the blues or rock 'n roll. LOL Guess I'm in a mood too.
Jun/30/2010, 9:33 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Survivor of the Twentieth Century


Christ, you two, Auto and Kat, are more the realists than I am.

Tere
Jun/30/2010, 10:45 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 


Add a reply

Page:  1  2  3 





You are not logged in (login)