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Terreson Profile
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Also signed.

Tere
Jul/1/2010, 11:03 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Here is the Countdown interview I mentioned earlier. Robert Kennedy Jr. is interviewed around the 3:00 minute mark.

"Robert Kennedy Jr. On Holding BP Accountable":

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2010/07/01/robert_kennedy_jr_on_holding_bp_accountable.html

Here is a link to the transcrpt of the show:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38055742/
Jul/4/2010, 10:07 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Thanks, Kat. Good interview. It reinforces my suspicions.

Tere
Jul/4/2010, 1:09 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Let me explain something, please. In our News You Can Use forum Kat posted a link to an ezine called "Poets For Living Waters." I submitted two poems and a prose poem for consideration. Submission guidelines called for responses to Katrina and the spill. Then I got around to closely reviewing the ezine. And I was saddened. By the poetizing. By the ambulance chasing, so to speak. By the names of professional poets. By the self-promoting in the form of photos and bios. I then wrote another email and asked my material be withdrawn from consideration.

Please understand I am not saying anything against my buddy Kat here. I was taken up with the ezine's notion too. It seemed like a good idea.

I am sitting here tonight and more than just a little dazed. I continue to follow the spill closely. I keep up with the interactive maps, follow the local news, keep researching. The dispersant, for example, BP is using is bad, bad and toxic stuff. Proprietary name is Corexit. Active ingredient is a petroleum based solvent called 2-Butoxyethanol and it can cause respiratory problems. There is also the suspicion it is being used to keep the crude from coming ashore, keep it at the bottom of the Gulf: out of sight out of mind and BP is not liable for anything.

Late last night, and just like Steinbeck's Doc a little drunk, I thought perhaps I was being harsh and judgemental of the Poets For Living Waters thing. I don't know why. Maybe I needed to refresh my memory. I went to You Tube. I was in Katrina, albeit in a town on her left and weaker side, and then she turned right. And she still brought my town to its knees. What she did to N.O.'s was to tear apart the social fabric completely. The flood literally tore apart hand clasps of husband and wife. It left bodies on the streets to bloat, go putrid in late August heat. It damn near destroyed a police dept, a fire dept. In at least one hospital without power to power life support systems there were mercy killings of patients that could not be evacuated. Snipers took shots from rooftops. Street gangs organized to loot for items such as baby formula and diapers and water and bread, all of which got distributed to poor people too poor to evacuate.

Now this. Katrina took down human life. The Deepwater Horizon spill takes down all life, an entire eco-system. And both are man-made disasters visited on the same region in less than five years.

The first three videos are very hard to watch. I can't view them without crying. The fourth link is to over 400 photos and numbing. But I'll not cotton to poetry not grounded.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paEz72TEb6U&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IblL_rXpdu8&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zXZ-R0mcN0&NR=1

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/04/30/louisiana-oil-spill-2010_n_558287.html

Terreson

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I don't know what to say. The more I search for info the worse it all seems. The Gulf sit. is bad, real bad. We've all lived in a fool's paradise since before I was born.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10657124&ref=emailfriend
Jul/7/2010, 6:21 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Again, don't know what to say.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2010-06-26-gulf-widow-oil-spill_N.htm

Tere
Jul/8/2010, 1:54 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Found this through the Nature Conservancy. A glimmer of hope.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/environment/2010-07-08-sea-turtles-oil_N.htm

Tere
Jul/9/2010, 6:22 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Radio report said this morning that the turtle recovery effort is looking to relocate some 70,000 eggs. The only good news I've heard since 20 April. I sure hope they pull it off. Everyone else, and I do mean everyone else, has been screwing up since day One.

Tere
Jul/10/2010, 12:47 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Dated today, 10 July. Proof BP is using law enforcement to gag the truth.

http://bpoilslick.blogspot.com/

Tere
Jul/10/2010, 2:15 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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What's going on down here is all so crazy. Here is another report from a birder. The parish mentioned is to the west of the Mississippi Delta and spill site.

~Labird,
        I mentioned in a separate post that X and I surveyed
about 20 miles of Cameron Parish beach yesterday. This gave us a good
chance to see the extent of the sandwall building activities, a
firsthand view of the effectiveness of the project, and a little more
insight into the project in general.
        Johnsons Bayou area: Sections of wall have been erected on the
beaches south of Johnson's Bayou. In this area the walls are fairly
short in length, perhaps 100 yards in each instance, and are set on the
southern boundaries of tidal pools at the edge of marsh. I can
understand the desire to protect these areas. However, most or all of
these walls have been compromised or just plain breached by waves or by
the tidal flow in and out of the pools.
        Holly Beach area: These were the walls I saw a few weeks back.
They run from around the point where the highway leaves the beach near
Constance Beach back to the east for perhaps a mile or two. These walls
have taken a downright beating in a few places, and are clearly weakened
in others. The boxes have an exoskeleton of woven wire. When the boxes
collapse, the wires bend and the structure gives way. In some places the
mangled boxes have been massed into piles like tangled metal pwell; I
don't know if waves or bulldozers built these heaps. In other places,
the boxes are noticeably sagging and bulging. They don't look like
they'll survive another good fight. Where water went over, through,
under, or around the boxes, it has been held back to form stagnant moats
between the road and the wall. These moats make access to the wall a
concern.
         Greater Holly Beach: The wall is conspicuously absent from the
town of Holly Beach, despite its low-lying location and the propensity
of the tide to ride well into the town. I don't know if this gap is
temporary or if it's in place for economic or aesthetic purposes. Its
absence there is curious.
         Holly Beach East: The wall picks up again to the east of town,
perhaps for its longest stretch. The wall has also suffered in spots
here. Picture a line of people standing tall, reinforced with their arms
locked over neighboring shoulders. Now imagine that some in the row have
become too drunk to stand and have lain down while still interlocked
with their chums. Imagine that others have simply buckled at the knees
and are hanging on by the grace and grit of their neighbors. More of the
wall here is sober than sloshed, but the stress of the weak and missing
links is obvious.
         Rutherford Beach area: We were surprised to discover a stretch
of wall on Rutherford Beach. This short stretch of wall was apparently
designed to protect a tidal stream from gulf influence. This wall is
parallel to the beach, with its wings bowed landward like a parenthesis.
The ends are set like dams across the stream, but they've been eroded
down by the tidal flow so that now the stream has its own cupped wall to
admire as it passes by.
         Near this spot we met a resident of the parish. In discussing
the wall we discovered that he wasn't a fan of it. He mentioned that
he'd warned the guardsmen building the wall not to use the beach sand as
fill, as that particular stretch of beach had taken a hit from Ike and
was vulnerable to erosion. They told him they had orders, and continued
scooping up the sand from the beach and dumping it into the containers.
He called the C.P. Office of Homeland Security but his complaint must've
fallen on deaf ears. I forgot to ask what route the vehicles had taken
to reach the spot. If they came from the Rutherford Beach community to
the east, they passed through colonies of Least Terns and other beach
nesters. However, judging from the trashed state of the Broussard Beach
entrance, the vehicles may well have come from the west.
         Incidentally, I received a call from a guardsman this week
about the C.P. wall. I'll say right out front that he was a gentleman
and that we had a nice conversation. However, the reason for his call
was to inform me that the facts I had written in a previous Labird post
(and reposted on Len Bahr's website) were inaccurate. He wanted to let
me know that beach sand was not being used as fill. According to the
guardsman, the fill is all being brought in from sand pits. I did see
trucks dumping sand along Holly Beach, but I'll take the eyewitness
testimony of the resident as strong evidence that my caller was not
absolutely correct.~

Tere
Jul/11/2010, 3:27 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Terreson Profile
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


https://app.e2ma.net/app/view:CampaignPublic/id:31166.8451493766/rid:dc94eb62a9135e8d17e7ad147c28b0a4

Sorry. You will have to cut and paste to the link.

Tere

Last edited by Terreson, Jul/18/2010, 3:46 pm
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Notice the disparity between counts:

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/07/oil_hits_louisianas_largest_pe.html

And this:

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/07/test_results_from_oil_well_not.html

Finally this, a visible only progress of the blob as of yesterday:


http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/oil-spill-map.htm

Tere
Jul/18/2010, 3:52 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Maybe it is me. Maybe it is a function of media coverage. Maybe it is both, what I suppose would almost amount to an exchange.

The Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf got me to thinking. Are there other such monstrous spills in the world? The answer seems worse than yes.

In the Niger delta, Nigeria, a delta far richer than the Mississippi delta and from where America gets 10% of its oil, there are something like 2,000 spills ongoing. Some, all, a few of which are characterized as Exxon Valdeze size. In China's Yellow Sea an oil delivery pipe is broken. In Russia spills occur frequently. Greater portion of the Persian Gulf is fouled for generations to come. I think the North Sea has a few spills in progress.

What is upcoming for oil drillers are the Grand Banks, one of the world's richest areas of fish. But also known as iceberg alley. Deep waters, my sweets.

This madness has to stop.

Tere
Jul/20/2010, 6:11 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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I've said before I have a few contacts, people to one degree or another involved in the Gulf spill. The word is out that I want information, first hand information. And my contacts know I am posting the info here and sometimes on FB. What follows is some of what the media is not covering in any depth. Increasingly my sense is that this is also some of what the powers that be do not want out there.

My contact and I have a not so slight disagreement with respect to his concluding observation. He says the marshes will recover and, as he puts it, persist. I say, yes, that is true. But in order to do so they will first have to die. This is not a conclusion I've come to on my own. This is what environmentalists more experienced are saying. I've told my friend this strikes me as a pretty big caveat.

Tere

~I'm not a blogger or a journalist, but I know a bit about what's going on. Here are my thoughts on a recent trip. Share this if you like, but wait a couple of days and please keep the source anonymous.

I recently went out to Lafitte, into Barataria Bay. As you'd expect, I saw floating oil - not sheens, but thick dark waters that looked as if a cloud were overhead. Our probes came up oiled, and they brought up large dollops of blackened funk. The edges of the marsh were flattened beneath the weight of the goop. The Spartina was dying out and within the dead zone, giant cutgrass was sprouting. There were several dead birds partially sunken into the crude - feathers, bones jutting, and the yellow pallor of bird carcass. I saw only a few pelicans, no cormorants, and 6 terns. I saw only 2 fish jump during the entire 14 h cruise.

I was impressed by the retooling of the local economy. This place had been growing since Katrina - charter lodges, ecotourism - and now, the captains all work for the Vessels of Opportunity program, where BP pays captains more than they'd made in their tenure as a charterman to tote BP, NOAA, and State scientists into the marshes to assess oil damage. Oyster and Fishing boats now moved cleanup cargo, and other ships were retooled for cleanup. Once popular fishing lodges had instead gone into the cleanup business. Not to diminish their plight and heartbreak, but these people are seeing better money than probably ever before ... although they know it won't last forever.

And yes, the fresh water. We measured salinity throughout the bay, and it ranged from 2 - 4 ppt. That's way too fresh for marine life. As such, the oysters and other inverts are mostly already dead.

If you look up Davis Pond and the Caernarvon Outfalls on the USGS website, you'll see that they've been pumping out water like crazy since April 19th .... 1 day BEFORE the spill.
http://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?site_no=295124089542100
( view 120 d worth of discharge data)

You see, they opened it up as part of normal operations, and then the spill happened and they seized upon that chance to open the gates and pump more than they would have been able to otherwise. I know for a fact that OCPR scientists concluded that the fresh water would have no impact whatsoever on the oil coming ashore (and they were right), and instead would kill off the estuarine species - like oysters and shrimp. So why did they do it?

Fact: Jindal established OCPR (a split off from DNR) to build wetlands. Fact: Freshwater diversions always conflict with commercial oyster growers because the diversions are upstream of the outlets ... and the LA oysterman are among the most powerful in the state. Fact: The order to pump came from the top, not as a consensus from OCPR.

My opinion? Jindal needs to look good and OCPR needs to be successful, especially because of the upcoming elections. That region had been recently harvested, so many farmers made their money. So, figuring that the oil would kill off the oysters, they went ahead and pumped as much as they could under the guise of "fending off the oil" so they could accelerate their time table. What many may not know is that the DNR has been at odds with the Oyster industry for as long as any can remember. Recently, DNR/OCPR managed to chip away at oysterman's stranglehold on their lease rights by including a restoration clause - basically, they can do whatever they want in the name of restoration, including (for example) building roads over leases. But let's not forget - Louisiana IS sinking, and we really do need coastal restoration. Some argue that oystermen have too much power (and they ARE sue-happy) and that this is a step in the right direction. I'm not going to make a value judgement, but I will note that the resource is the stepchild tugged back and forth between political agendas.

People have repeatedly asked me - will the marshes survive? I could say a lot about this, but in a nutshell, I think they will. Remember, we're the sump for the country, and the marshes have been a nutrient sink as the Mississippi dumped organic funk into their waters. They teem with bacteria who actually eat oil. They survived and thrived after natural fires - as long as the roots persist, the grasses come back. And most of the key species that comprise the food chain are highly fecund, so even in the face of larval decimation, some should survive. The birds, turtles, and mammals may not be so lucky in the short-term, ESPECIALLY since the Berm projects are side-stepping the ESA and allowing "take" of turtles - yet another Jindal stunt to build wetland and to appear proactive, without actually assessing impacts to ecosystems. I think, though, that the environmental lobby is strong enough to rally protection for those species.

Just like the residents of Lafitte, the marsh will persist, and life will re-emerge just as it has after the some 100 spills that happen every year that the media never rants about.~

Jul/25/2010, 3:01 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Old news but new to me:

FBI Investigates BP's Ties to Regulators

A team of federal investigators are gathering in New Orleans to determine, among other things, whether BP was criminally cozy with federal Regulators, and whether that helped cause the Deepwater Horizon explosion. The wide-ranging Criminal Probe will also focus on Transocean and Halliburton, the Washington Post reports, but there’s little doubt who the big fish is. The FBI-run team, which also includes EPA and Coast Guard investigators, is known as the “BP Squad.”


http://thetvrealist.com/gossip/FBI-Investigates-BPs-Ties-to-Regulators-3139228.html

And this recent development:

Barge hits well near Gulf, sends oil, gas spewing

Officials say 6,000 feet of containment boom is in place around the site, which was already fouled by BP spill


http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2010/07/27/oil_well_accident
Jul/28/2010, 8:43 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
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But for the locals, people are acting as if the Mocondo spill is over. BP, in fact, has scaled back on its clean up effort. I've even heard the claim that 75% of the spill, that's three-quarters of over four million barrrels, has either evaporated or been eaten up by microbes. You know about the microbes, right? They are the wee people come over from Ireland. Even if some say they are the holograms of pacmans and pacwomans donated by the video gaming industry. Truth is, the clean up effort has missed much of the oil beneath the surface.

The local news media is anything but radical:

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/100172129.html

Tere
Aug/7/2010, 1:59 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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http://lacoastpost.com/blog/

The blogger, Len Bahr, is a retired LA scientist whose field involves estuarian ecology. He worked for the state for many years, under several different governors. His retirement may have been forced on him by the present governor. He is pointedly critical of the state's recovery efforts, especially the sand berm that is Jindal's much vaunted project. He is quoted as saying scientists still in the state's employment are afraid to speak up for fear of losing their jobs.

Tere

Last edited by Terreson, Aug/10/2010, 4:34 pm
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Katlin Profile
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Tere,

I came across this blog post by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, a Sufi writer I am somewhat familiar with, and thought of you and your reaction to the Gulf oil spill:

Of course it is a big step between watching the disaster on the news and recognizing that it is happening to each of us, just as through this crisis life is speaking to each of us. But when we see what our technology, our lifestyles, our values, have caused does it not touch the heart and soul of each of us? We are all responsible. And we need to return to the core of our humanity, to the sacred connection to life that is within each of us. We need to be attentive and listen.

This quality of awareness belongs to the ancient wisdom of the earth that was always known to our ancestors. And when the earth is crying out to us with such a potent image as it is now, is it not our duty to listen? Only when we hear what it is saying, not just in our minds but also in our souls, will we know how to respond.

If we are to reclaim a real relationship to life and to our planet, we must listen to the real story that is being told. It is not just a story of a deep well disaster happening in the Gulf. It is about how our present civilization is causing the waters of life to be polluted and how at present we cannot stop it. And this disaster is taking place all around us and also in our own souls. Only if we listen to life will we know how to respond.


http://www.sevenpillarshouse.org/blog/article/an_ecological_disaster_polluting_the_waters_of_life
Aug/23/2010, 10:44 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
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Thanks, Kat. And, of course, the author is speaking a language I get.

Back in the 80s a bunch of intellectuals working independently of each other tried to face head on the disconnect that has brought the modern world to its present crisis and crisis it is. The case each of them made tended to come to the same conclusion: it began with the invention of the scientific method of analysis following on the collection of empirical proof. In effect, the collective conclusion was that science has denatured nature. Every concept has its reverse, Jung said. Every dream has its nightmare I have said. The huge step away from nature, they all maintain, was made by Francis Bacon, father of the scientific method. In order to gain knowledge about a species the individual gets killed off. I have to deal with this queasy causing practice every day. And it is always in the back of my brain that John Audobon, the great naturalist, ground checked, shot out of the sky, each and every bird he painted and anatomized. Some ornithologists still do.

Can it be any wonder we have manifestly denatured nature?

More and more I think Campbell was right. Nothing short of bowing the knee before mystery will save the planet and save the human soul.

Tere
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I've gotten a bad report, at this point purely anecdotal. I've been saying for months now that what the spill doesn't kill the recovery effort will.

It seems LAs governor ordered a bunch of damns, locks, and sluices opened in an effort to push fresh water into the Gulf, push it against the tide movement, in order to keep the oil from coming into the marshes. The idea makes sense but always the unintended consequences of any and all ideas.

LAs oyster beds have been impacted I'm told. I read the word "mortality" and that means death on the oyster beds because of the fresh water, too much fresh water, in the brackish marshes oysters thrive in. What BP hasn't killed we are bound to.

Tere
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Here it is. As soon as the oil was not showing up substantially in the wetlands and along the coast this was my next fear. It is even worse.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129782098&sc=emaf

Tere
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And it goes on and on and on. The below message was passed on to me.

Tere

~I copied an email from a birding-ornithologist companion of mine. More oil....


All-
    Yesterday (Thursday) was our third "oil disaster" survey of Whiskey
Island, western Isles Derniers barrier island chain. It had been about 6
weeks since our last visit on 4 Aug. Weathered oil present on that visit
was mostly still present, despite the presence of a BP "oil cleanup crew"
stationed there for the past 2 months (very similar to the situation we
found on East Timbalier Island last week). I suppose that we can't expect
quick results if the guys are only working 20 minutes of every hour, and
only being able to get 10 minutes away from the sanctuary (yes, there was a
15 knot wind, but they had shade, and fans powered by gas generators). I
don't know how Donna and I managed to hike the whole 4 mile island non-stop
in 5.5 hours.... But I digress.
    Adding to our frustration were considerable deposits of "new" oil on
Whiskey Island. Of course, "new" is a relative term, especially for the LA
Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries, which has proclaimed that no "new" oil is
washing up on LA beaches (see Thursday's Baton Rouge Advocate). Since when
is LDWF the authority on whether or not oil is washing up? Heck, there I go
again. So, anyway, there were MILES of "relatively new" soft oil-sand
"tarballs" ranging in size from small blobs to extra LARGE pizzas.
 Meanwhile, the cleanup crew was at the far end of the island.....
 Considering that until very recently there were still untouched oil slicks
on some Grand Isle shorelines, where tremendous cleanup resources have been
concentrated, then it is no surprise that these more remote areas are
getting token attention at best.
    The good news is that there were few oiled birds, which is mainly
because there is less and less fresh gooey oil washing up. For whatever
reason, the birds are not coming in contact with the denser, sandier
tarballs. There were few birds along the heavily oiled stretch of beach.
 Perhaps that's an indication of decreased invertebrate resources in the
contaminated sand? Or they somehow avoid such oily stretches?
    The birding was fairly routine. The continued presence of small
numbers of Long-billed Curlews is of interest this far east. Six of 24
Piping Plovers were banded; most of these were photographed and we should be
able to trace their banding site. Wilson's Plovers, oystercatchers, Least
Terns, Sandwich Terns, nighthawks, and Orchard Orioles have largely or
totally cleared out. Caspian Tern numbers have surged. Landbird migrants
were generally absent except for the Blue Grosbeak and an unidentified
sparrow/warbler type bird.

Have a great weekend.~
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I said this last spring but now the word is getting credibility. In addition to the BOP failure the cement recipe used to cap the Macondo well that blew has been tested by three seperate groups. By BP, by Haliburton, and by the Feds. All three groups have demonstrated that the particular recipe used, and using liquid nitrogen to keep it fluid for longer, fails to set properly. Fails to set properly.

When bringing up the possibility of cement failure, what I said last spring was that it was mind boggling that technology I observed when working off-shore in '76 is still in play. (An expert has actually said the technology hasn't essentially changed in over fifty years.) And, again, in '76 deep water drilling was measured in hundreds, not thousands of feet.

I heard today figures of somewhere between three and four million barrels of oil spilled in the Gulf. And we now know a layer of crude has settled on portions of the seafloor. What I don't get is the lack of media attention to both the spill's impact and the recovery effort's impact on the environment. It seems I need to do some more digging.

Tere
Oct/28/2010, 5:19 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/06/science/earth/06coral.html?_r=1&hp

Here we are, my sweets.

Tere


Last edited by Terreson, Nov/5/2010, 8:14 pm
Nov/5/2010, 8:09 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Has anyone read the article? One scientist calls it the smoking gun. Circumstanial evidence clear. The death otherwise unexplainable. And I understand BP has reported a profit. I hear locals are happy they have.

Tere
Nov/6/2010, 4:08 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


This one especially hurts the heart as dolphins have always been a bit of a totem animal for me:

Baby dolphins dying along oil-soaked US Gulf Coast

GULFPORT, Mississippi – Baby dolphins are washing up dead along the oil-soaked US Gulf Coast at more than 10 times the normal rate in the first birthing season since the BP disaster, researchers said.

Some 17 baby dolphin corpses have been found along the shorelines of Alabama and Mississippi in the past two weeks, The Institute for Marine Mammal Studies said.

"The average is one or two a month. This year we have 17, and February isn't even over yet," said Moby Solangi, director of the Gulfport, Mississippi-based institute.

"For some reason, they've started aborting or they were dead before they were born."


http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/22/baby-dolphins-dying-along-oil-soaked-us-gulf-coast/
Feb/25/2011, 9:07 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
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Thank you, Kat. I listened to the NPR report yesterday and made a note to search for more info. For what it is worth the report mentioned over 60 dolphins found dead in the area, half of which were immatures.

Tere
Feb/26/2011, 2:05 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
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Re: Marsh spoiled so we can have plastic


Proof conclusive. The Macondo spill still in progress. Well still leaking.

http://blog.al.com/live/2011/08/scientists_oil_fouling_gulf_co.html

Tere
Aug/27/2011, 12:09 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 


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