Runboard.com
You're welcome.
Community logo


runboard.com       Sign up (learn about it) | Sign in (lost password?)

Page:  1  2 

 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Kat's NaPoMo 2011 and Beyond


My first poem was written for the prompt:

Poet or Fool?

There's a line from a song that's become a bit of an earworm leading up to today: "She could have been a poet or she could have been a fool."

Write a poem where the first line of the poem contains the word "poet" (poets or poetry are also acceptable) and the last line contains the word "fool."


http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13334


eeeee taptap Testing

Is there a poet in the house?
Metaphorical emergency
in Aisle 3, between the weed killer
and compost heap. Kitty-corner
to Manure Galore, InstaGrass,
Perfect Patch. Wheelbarrows
we have. Rakes and hoes. Seed
spreaders too. Did I mention
the mulch? Our customized,
computerized, predesigned
beds of every size are either a
master's gardener or a brow-
furrowing, weed-whacking
fool’s paradise.


Last edited by Katlin, Mar/28/2012, 9:00 am
Apr/2/2011, 10:08 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Today's poem is based on the prompt:

Poem: Word Cloud

Here http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/3388459/April_2nd

is a word cloud. Create a poem inspired by words, or clusters of words from the cloud.

http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13342

I assigned myself the task of using some variation of all of the words.


Sin and Sanity

You know the story of sin and sanity: The voices in your mind are your worst critics. They sing the “f” song of fat cat failures and false acquittals. Until they own you. Measuring out your life by the medications in your coffee cup, you drop a thread of needful wonder. No little wind can save you. (You’re either living, or your expiring. Trite but true.) Something unrecognized and unrequited in Mother Nature growls for you. A burning gust of prayerful lust is a sign; your unwritten dreams are coming true.


Last edited by Katlin, Apr/2/2011, 7:43 pm
Apr/2/2011, 7:39 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


hi Kat,

Good to see you doing NaPo with these smart, creative prompts. Much enjoyed the unexpected turns, "a burning gust of prayerful lust"

keep 'em coming!

Chris
Apr/3/2011, 8:20 am Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Thanks, Chris. So far, so fun.

Today's poem is taken from the prompt:

We all know how hard it can be to write a really good poem, but lets find out if you can deliberately write a piece of pure schlock. Let it be an Olympics of awfulness, a display of doggerel. It could be harder than you think.

http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13346

Here is my inaugural doggerel:

Love Is a Many Splendid Thing

I love you so much
words can not convey
but that’s okay
I never trusted shitty words anyway

I loved you and loved you and loved you some more.
Now you are gone and my heart, she is tore.

Oh-oh, you left me all alone
& that’s why I’m sad.
I know how you hate it when I !@#$ and I moan
but was being with me really so bad?!?

I’ll l find love again tomorrow! I will! Yes, I will!
I’ll live and I’ll love and I’ll show the worthless likes
of assholes like you!

I wrote a poem toaday
and this is it.
were dose it say
anyone gives a !@#$?


Last edited by Katlin, Apr/3/2011, 10:21 am
Apr/3/2011, 10:02 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Bleh emoticon

The judges are wincing and holding up 10's.

Chris
Apr/3/2011, 3:17 pm Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
libramoon Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


"Here is my inaugural doggerel: "

and yet so many do so much worse without even trying ...
Apr/3/2011, 8:15 pm Link to this post Send Email to libramoon   Send PM to libramoon Blog
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Thought much the same about Kat's poem, Libra. It comes to me that doggerel poetry is kind of hard to make.

Tere
Apr/3/2011, 10:58 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Hi guys, Do you think I should be worried that bad poems are so fun and easy for me to write? emoticon

Today's poem:


Tennessee Waltz
      (for HB)

“It’s taking too long to suit me,”
he says as she sits, an old maid
at the dance whose favor he must
curry at last with a nod
and an outstretched hand.
He'd prefer a foxtrot
or polka, not a Tennessee
waltz of surrender
when Dame Fortune strikes up the band.


Last edited by Katlin, Apr/4/2011, 1:02 pm
Apr/4/2011, 11:56 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Tweaking yesterdays' poem to clarify who "she" is:

Tennessee Waltz
      (for HB)

“It’s taking too long to suit me,”
he says as Death sits, an old maid
at the dance whose favor he must
curry at last with a nod
and an outstretched hand.
He preferred a foxtrot
or polka, not a Tennessee
waltz of surrender when
Dame Fortune struck up the band.




Apr/5/2011, 8:27 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Now I understand this poem for Herman. It's devastating.

Chris
Apr/5/2011, 9:07 am Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Hi Chris,

Yes, for Herman. I had originally written Death instead of she but changed it. Then realized without more clues though, it seemed like I was just writing about some guy courting an old maid. Herman loves music, and he always loved going out dancing with his wife. In fact, I think that is how they met: at a dance.
Apr/5/2011, 11:24 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Responding to another prompt today:

James Wright's beautiful poem, Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy's Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota, is filled with beautiful imagery followed by the unexpected closing line, "I have wasted my life"

Write a poem that somewhere includes the line "I have wasted my life" - whether it be the first line, the last line, or somewhere in between. No other limitations, just that one line somewhere in the poem.


http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13360

Nuclear Radiation Leakage

People of Fukushima,
I though of you today.
But not enough.
What does that mean?
It means I’m pronoun challenged.
I can pray and send money.
I can reduce my carbon footprint. (Really?)
I can protest the nuclear plant
built on two fault lines, less
than 50 miles of where I live.
I can write a damn poem
or ponder Jesus saying, “The poor
will always be with you.”
Follow that up with Buddha’s First
Noble Truth: “All life is suffering.”
I can say thank you—thank you—for
the life I am living.
I-aye-yai, yai, yai
I have wasted my life.

Last edited by Katlin, Apr/5/2011, 12:34 pm
Apr/5/2011, 11:49 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


You go, girl. There is verve in what you are doing.

Tere
Apr/5/2011, 6:59 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Thanks, Tere. I'm still going, but I'm slowing down.

Today's prompt:

speak as someone or something that never speaks, or is never allowed the eloquence to properly express themselves.

http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13365

Yours Truly

From barnyard to boardroom,
they call me the bane of existence,
stealth assassin, Satan’s
right-hand man.

I am Omega
life’s consort
Christ’s springboard
dark face of the Goddess

To some, I’m the great equalizer.
To others, the great awakener.

I’m billed as the end of all
suffering, a ticket to rebirth,
the fast track to nowhere or
some place much worse.

Some look over their left shoulders
and shiver. But you know this.
Besides, what others say
means nothing to me.

Who do you say that I am?
Apr/7/2011, 9:20 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Fine, powerful writing Kat, life's consort/Christ's springboard

Doesn't read like you're slowing down.

Chris
Apr/7/2011, 10:57 am Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Hi Chris,

Thank you for the vote of confidence. No new poems the past few days. That's where the title of this thread comes in. Maybe next week?
Apr/9/2011, 9:02 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Good stuff, Kat. Contagion comes to mind.

Tere
Apr/9/2011, 1:05 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Today's entry is a prose poem, taken form this prompt:

Secrets - Everybody's got them. The really hard part is keeping a secret. Write a poem about a secret. It can be your own secret, a secret uncovered, or a secret you've been told to keep. It could even be a take-it-to-your-grave secret.

http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13372




Shroud of Memory

Lately, I’ve been thinking about the worlds within the world.

*

Lately, because the dead bodies over eight women, victims of a suspected serial killer, have been found in the underbrush along a beach road on Long Island, I’ve been thinking about a block not far from where I live. Last week I took an elderly friend, who needed to have her lenses changed, to the optometrist’s office on that block, but almost 15 years ago a homegrown serial killer lived on that street.

He murdered eight women, all prostitutes he picked up and strangled, then placed in the attic of his parents’ house, the home where he also lived. Neighbors had complained about the stench next door, but it wasn’t until one woman escaped and spoke to police that cops finally arrested Kendall Francois, who later pleaded guilty to the crimes and thereby avoided a trial and possible death sentence.

*

In 8th grade English class we were broken up into small groups and given an assignment: Pick a book to read. Our group, at the urging of Amy A., picked The Boston Strangler. When my mother saw the book, she said, “No!” and contacted the school. We were told by the guidance counselor not to read the book, but, of course, we all did. It was titillating and disturbing and scary, yes, but in the way a TV show or a movie is scary. Fictional scary. Not something that could happen to me, or someone like me.

*

When my parents separated and finally divorced but before my mother remarried, we lived with my grandparents. I used to play with two sisters, Cindy and Chrissy, who lived next door with their father, grandmother and two “maiden aunts” as my grandmother called them. Cindy was the oldest, quiet and studious, but Chrissy was considered the wild child and troublemaker. Both were Italian beauties, dark-haired and petite. I was tall, blonde and envious.

*

Police considered Francois a suspect early on in the investigation and had him under surveillance for a time. They interviewed him once, and he even took detectives to the house and showed them his bedroom. Afterward a detective said the house was in “horrendous condition” with “garbage virtually everywhere” and that the place “smelled awful.”

*

What I remember about those years was the aroma of garlic and tomatoes coming from Cindy’s house, so different from smell of the meatloaf and sauerbraten that came from my grandmother’s kitchen. I always wished Cindy would invite me to dinner, but she never did. I remember, too, Cindy telling me about the dirty magazines she discovered one day while cleaning her father's bedroom. I pretended I knew the kind of magazines she was referring, but at the time I didn’t.
*

According to a later report, Francois had contracted HIV from one of the prostitutes he was known to frequent, but no one could confirm if that’s what determined his choice of victims, who were all dark-haired and petite.

*

Years later during a phone call, I asked my grandmother about Cindy and Chrissy. “Oh,” my grandmother said with a funny sound in her voice. “I guess I never told you. Cindy moved away after college, but Chrissy was murdered.” “Murdered?” “Yes, she went on vacation to Florida with a girlfriend, and she was murdered. It was terrible. They never found her killer.”

*

Francois played football in high school, did a stint in the army and worked as a middle-school monitor before he was fired for “inappropriate behavior” with female students. The kids at the school nicknamed him “Stinky.” His mother, a psychiatric nurse, never suspected the smell from the attic wasn’t a family of dead raccoons, unreachable between the walls. What mother, even one who worked at a state mental hospital, could imagine that under her own roof her son was engaging in necrophilia?

I didn’t know that last detail and had forgotten many others until I researched the case this morning on the internet. What I remembered were the months of searching for the missing women and the public’s questioning if Francois would have been apprehended sooner had he been targeting coeds at the nearby college rather than street women he brought home for drugs and sex when his family was away.

*

Driving by the campus yesterday, a friend told me he recently interviewed a woman who confided that her daughter had gone to the school but had decided to drop out because “too many lesbians go there.” During the summer, I enjoy walking on the campus grounds, which have always felt like sacred land to me.

*

“My grandmother, who—God willing—will be 100 this summer, has often remarked when she watches the news, “What’s this world coming to?”

*

“We’re low lifes, that’s what it comes down to. People don’t care that we’re missing because they don’t think we belong on the streets in the first place. It’s just not the police, it’s the community,” a prostitute told the local newspaper back in the late 90s.

*

I’ve never understood the appeal of slasher movies and their sequels. Halloween. Scream.

*

Recalling just now some lines from Frost:

“They cannot scare me with their empty spaces
Between stars—on stars where no human race is.”

*

They say some of the bodies found on Long Island were wrapped in burlap. Unconfirmed reports say some of the bodies were clothed, others were naked.

*

Hannah Arendt wrote of the banality of evil, and lately I’ve been thinking of the nearby, neighborliness of it. Nothing new in that insight, but today it stops me.



Last edited by Katlin, Apr/12/2011, 6:33 pm
Apr/12/2011, 12:28 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Said simply, this is good writing. For an improv piece composition especially blows me away.

Tere
Apr/12/2011, 7:32 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Thanks, Tere. After I wrote this, I felt drained and shaky. Was reminded of Roethke's "The Waking":

"This shaking keeps me steady. I should know.
What falls away is always. And is near.
I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
I learn by going where I have to go."

Regarding the Frost poem, the final lines are:

"They cannot scare me with their empty spaces
Between stars--on stars where no human race is.
I have it in me so much nearer home
To scare myself with my own desert places."

For the purposes of this poem, I guess I'd say, "our own desert places."

This piece was difficult to write. I worked on it, and resisted working on it, for almost a week. Then this morning, every morning show TV channel I turned on had a story on the potential LI serial killer.
Apr/12/2011, 8:14 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Also, for the record I wanted to say, I got the information and quotes about the Francois case from this link:

http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/francois/disappeared_1.html
Apr/12/2011, 8:22 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Kat, put this on other boards please. It wants a larger readership.

Tere
Apr/12/2011, 9:35 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Hi Kat,

Yes, good writing, sustained and controlled. One thought/impression/piece of information leading naturally to another. "the nearby, neighborliness of it..." whew.

Chris
Apr/13/2011, 9:27 am Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Thanks for the encouragement, Chris. Your support and Tere's and this board in general mean so much to me.

The prompt I am using today:

Ever heard of the Fibonacci Numbers? Bascially, it's a series of numbers where each number in the series is the sum of the two previous numbers.

A Fibonacci Poem (or 'Fib') is similar to a Haiku; the poem's structure is based on the number of syllables per line.

There are six lines in a Fib. The number of syllables per line is: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 8.

. . .

Write a Fibonacci Poem about any subject you choose.


http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13351

Tea Party Cheer

Lean
to
the right.
Lean more to
the right. Stand up, sit
down. Fight, team, fight! Shut it down! Yay!

Note to Self

Why
try
to change
others if
you can’t change yourself?
Look to the log in your own eye.
Apr/14/2011, 10:30 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


I'm a few days behind on posting, so here's a found poem from last week:

Your Devil's Advocate (now with Bunnies!)

it is said that hate is born out of fear, and fear is born out of misunderstanding. Take something you actively despise ( exs.: a political party; your neighbor's cat; acronyms; Charles Bukowski; weeds) and try to write a sympathetic poem from their viewpoint. Parody and sarcasm welcome.

OR

if that's too much, write about cute, fuzzy bunnies.


http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13379

Rep. Mike Pence, Team Player

“But we’re trying—we’re trying
to score a victory

for the Republican people,
for —for the American—

for the Republican people—
trying to score a victory

for the American people,
not for the Republican Party.

That victory is going to come
in stages here.”

http://thinkprogress.org/2011/04/07/pence-republican-people/
Apr/14/2011, 10:56 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Another poem from last week:

Poem for a Poet

Write a poem to the poet or poem that you most admire and makes you want to improve your craft.


http://www.criticalpoet.com/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=13382


The Price of Taking

By the front door of the round building
on the last day of the writing workshop,
someone has placed a mounded plate
and a stack of papers. “Cookies & Rumi”
the sign says. “Take some!”
Apr/14/2011, 1:42 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Christine98 Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


hi Kat,

I'm impressed by the creativity happening within the limitations of the prompts, especially the Fibonacci Poems...I'm guessing the "devil's advocate," was equally challenging.

Chris
Apr/15/2011, 10:44 am Link to this post Send Email to Christine98   Send PM to Christine98
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Hey Chris,

You know, some reason the limitations imposed by the prompts are actually helping me. I haven't written a poem a day, but I know I wouldn't have written as many as I have without the pre-determined framework. I remember you and Tere did NaMoPo a few years back without any prompts except the ones you each came up with; I still marvel at folks who can do that.
Apr/15/2011, 7:17 pm Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 
Terreson Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Kat, back to your Shroud of Memory poem. Arendt's banality of evil put you in mind of the nearby neighborliness of evil, yes? Well, you put me in mind of something I might call the communion of evil.

http://withoutsanctuary.org/

Tere



Last edited by Katlin, Apr/16/2011, 7:01 am
Apr/15/2011, 8:10 pm Link to this post Send Email to Terreson   Send PM to Terreson
 
Katlin Profile
Live feed
Blog
Friends
Miscellaneous info



Reply | Quote
Re: Kat's NaPoMo Maybe


Tere,

You will see that I have edited your post to make the link clickable. I have also added the link to your thread "A hateful subject: lynching In America" in Dicussion II.

"photographs and postcards taken as souvenirs at lynchings throughout America"

You call it the communion of evil; I might call it the common life of evil. But I think your phrase is more apt for what happens when evil is civic-sanctioned.
Apr/16/2011, 7:12 am Link to this post Send Email to Katlin   Send PM to Katlin
 


Add a reply

Page:  1  2 





You are not logged in (login)